Sometimes challenging, always inspiring: thoughts on winning an EAPC Early Researcher Award 

Daisy Janssen, elderly care and palliative care physician at CIRO+, Horn, and research co-ordinator at the Centre of Expertise for Palliative Care of the Maastricht UMC+, Maastricht, the Netherlands. Dr Janssen explains the research that led to her winning joint second prize in the EAPC Early Researcher Award announced last week in Lleida.

Dr Daisy Janssen

Dr Daisy Janssen

I first became interested in palliative care during medical school, after which I trained in elderly care medicine and palliative care. While working as a physician in a palliative care unit for patients with advanced chronic respiratory disease I learned that these patients and their loved ones had major palliative care needs and this stimulated me to study these needs. I had the opportunity to combine my clinical work with a PhD trajectory focused on exploring the palliative care needs of patients with advanced chronic organ failure, such as COPD, chronic heart failure or chronic renal failure. As part of my PhD I did a fellowship at the University of Washington in Seattle, US, and later obtained my PhD on palliative care needs of patients with advanced chronic organ failure cum laude in 2012 at Maastricht University in the Netherlands.

My work has identified a spectrum of palliative care needs of patients with advanced chronic organ failure that should be addressed in palliative care programmes such as symptom management, care dependency, caregiver burden and positive aspects of family caregiving. Finally, advance care planning is of major importance for patients with chronic organ failure.

Dr Daisy Janssen receives her award from Prof Dr Christoph  Ostgathe at the 8th EAPC World Research Congress in Lleida

Dr Daisy Janssen receives her award from Prof Dr Christoph Ostgathe at the 8th EAPC World Research Congress in Lleida

Currently, I am working as a physician at CIRO+ (Centre of Expertise for Chronic Organ Failure), taking care of patients with advanced chronic respiratory diseases. My research is embedded at CIRO+ and at the Centre of Expertise for Palliative Care at the Maastricht University Medical Centre+, in Maastricht in the Netherlands. Combining clinical care with research is sometimes challenging, but most of all it’s inspiring. It allows me to develop research projects that really have an impact on quality of care for patients, as well as their loved ones. Moreover, I am convinced that being a clinical researcher makes me a better physician.

I am currently supervising four PhD students, who are involved in various projects to better understand and address the needs of patients with chronic organ failure. For me, winning the joint second prize of the EAPC Early Researcher Award is an acknowledgement of my work and underlines the importance of palliative care for patients with advanced chronic organ failure. It inspires me to further develop my research line with the aim to improve quality of life of patients with advanced chronic organ failure and their loved ones. I am therefore very grateful to the EAPC for awarding me this prize and to my mentors: Dr Martijn Spruit, Prof Emiel Wouters, Prof Jos Schols, and Dr Randall Curtis for their ongoing support and their confidence in me. Moreover, I am grateful to The Lung Foundation Netherlands that financially supports part of my work.

Acknowledgement
A longer version of this article will also be published in the September issue of the European Journal of Palliative and is reproduced here ahead of publication with kind permission.

Find out more …
The Early Researcher Award (formerly Young Investigator Award) was created as an annual award by the EAPC in 2009. This award is designed to recognise the work of young (novice) scientists and clinicians in the field of palliative care who have recently made, or are currently making, an outstanding contribution to research. It aims to highlight their personal career development and their potential for the future. Click here to read posts from this year’s prizewinner and former Early Researcher Award prizewinners.

LLeida_fbSelected presentations from the 8th EAPC World Research Congress in Lleida now online… 
Even if you weren’t able to attend the congress held in Lleida, Spain, in June, you can now download some of the presentations and other information relating to the congress. Click here to view.

 

This entry was posted in EAPC Congresses, EAPC Researcher Awards, RESEARCH and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Sometimes challenging, always inspiring: thoughts on winning an EAPC Early Researcher Award 

  1. Pingback: Sometimes challenging, always inspiring: thoughts on winning an EAPC Early Researcher Award  | EAPC Blog | All Things Palliative - Article Feed

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