Palliative Stories – the new EAPC blog series from the perspective of patients and family carers

Helen Findlay is a PhD student in the College of Health and Life Sciences at Brunel University London, on the topic of ‘Service user involvement in palliative care’.

Helen Findlay

Helen Findlay

If someone had said to me earlier in my life that one day I would be pursuing a PhD in palliative care I would have seriously wondered what was going to happen to draw me to that particular topic. I was not a health or social care professional and had been awarded an MSc in Politics from Strathclyde University. It was to be an intense personal experience that provided the catalyst.

My father, James, was diagnosed with motor neurone disease (MND) towards the end of 2005. This was after eight years of looking after my mother, Joan, who developed dementia following a stroke. The speed of my father’s deterioration was an almighty shock – he died seven weeks after diagnosis. The inability of health and social services to provide appropriate care for him and my mother was also a shock and added to my father’s torment and that of his family in trying to do the best for him. This led to our writing The Findlay Report (see link below), published in 2006 after my father had died, that details his experience and our recommendations as to how the care could have been so much better. These include the need for everyone to have access to palliative care at the point of diagnosis of a terminal illness and the need for a ‘conductor’ to help people navigate through health, social care and other services. I firmly believe that a culture change is needed in healthcare provision particularly attitudes towards palliative care.

I am an active campaigner with the UK’s National Council for Palliative Care; Marie Curie Expert Voices Group; MND Association and the Cicely Saunders Institute. I have spoken at UK and European health, social and palliative care conferences and to members of parliament and Peers in the UK Parliament about my father’s MND story and my mother’s dementia and the impact that both experiences had on their family. I tweet extensively about palliative care and the issues surrounding it (@helenfindlay).

My PhD research involves exploring understandings of service user involvement in palliative care. My work so far has led me to the belief that non-clinical and non-health professionals and ordinary people should be positively encouraged to engage in palliative care research. This would help broaden perspectives and findings that can be put into practice and help drive progress and change in creative ways.

The year 2015 marks the start of the 10th year since my father died. My passion to improve palliative care has not diminished. During the past decade I have learnt that little victories are hard won and require even more effort to maintain. Changes in our approach to palliative care are necessary and have to come.

Find out more…

Read more ‘Palliative Stories’ on the EAPC blog
Later this month, Anne Molloy from Ireland will be sharing her story.
If you missed the introduction to this series, please click here.
If you have a patient, or a family member or friend, who would like to contribute to the series please contact the editor.

A message from the EAPC
We would like to thank everyone who has kindly contributed to this series of ‘Palliative Stories’. In publishing patients’ and families’ stories we are aware that content may sometimes focus only on one side of the story but we hope that the stories will help us all to better understand people’s palliative and end of life care experiences. Unfortunately, we are not able to give advice or comment on individual cases but we share in the distress that our contributors have experienced.

EAPC congress 2015If you’re coming to Copenhagen
If you’re attending the 14th EAPC World Congress in Copenhagen, please come along to the session on ‘User involvement in palliative care – do we need bridges between the knowledge of professionals, patients and relatives?’ on Saturday 9 May at 11-12.15 pm (parallel session 11). Follow us on Twitter @EAPCOnlus – our official congress hashtag is #eapc2015 

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Palliative Stories – Introduction to a new EAPC blog series from the perspective of patients and family carers

Professor Sheila Payne, President of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC), and Dr Mark Taubert, Clinical Director for Palliative Medicine at Velindre NHS Trust, Cardiff, UK, and Social Media User/Adviser/Non-Executive Director of DeadSocial, UK.

Professor Sheila Payne

Professor Sheila Payne

We are delighted to welcome a new EAPC blog series highlighting the accounts of patients and family carers. As an organisation dedicated to improving palliative care in Europe and beyond, the EAPC has tended to focus on the ‘voices’ and perspectives of professionals, although with the ultimate aim of benefitting patients and families who need palliative care services. Arguably, this is not enough. It is important to listen to, and learn from, the accounts (also called narratives or stories) of patients and families. They have direct experience of palliative care or, in some cases, lack of access to the palliative care services that they need.

Blogging has become part of everyday life, and much discussion about healthcare experiences happens in the online world. Patient voices are emerging everywhere online. There is an abundance of positive and negative experience being written and blogged daily, and our EAPC blog hopefully will capture a small proportion of the worldwide talk on palliative care. We hope that these blog stories start dialogue and debate, not just on the EAPC blog itself, but on other social media when they are retweeted, liked and pinged all over the world.

Dr Mark Taubert

Dr Mark Taubert

Because one of the most powerful ways to share experiences is by telling stories. We all have stories to tell. This is called emic knowledge, which comes from the inside, from having lived that experience – the unique knowledge that each patient and family has. This compares to etic knowledge, which is a collective knowledge about others’ experiences or abstract concepts, which are what doctors and nurses have. One type of knowledge is not better than another they just present slightly different views of the same situation. Most of the EAPC blog posts, and clinical and academic published papers, present etic knowledge, so this new series helps to redress the balance.

We therefore encourage you to read and reflect on the blogs, where patients and families will describe their experiences and understanding, some deeply moving and distressing. It is acknowledged that they offer one-sided accounts; we have not invited other people who were involved in each unique clinical case to provide their alternative accounts. The questions we suggest that you ask yourself while reading these blog posts are not about their ultimate truth or making a judgement on the apparent rights or wrongs of each case, but rather, whether they resonate with your clinical experience; why they were written; and what can we learn?

Read more ‘Palliative Stories’ on the EAPC blog
On Wednesday, Helen Findlay will be writing about her experience when her father was diagnosed with motor neurone disease. Thereafter, we’ll be publishing one or two stories from the series each month. If you have a patient, or a family member or friend, who would like to contribute to the series please contact the editor.

EAPC congress 2015Find out more in Copenhagen…
If you’re attending the 14th EAPC World Congress in Copenhagen,  please come along to the session on ‘User involvement in palliative care – do we need bridges between the knowledge of professionals, patients and relatives?’ on Saturday 9 May at 11-12.15pm (parallel session 11). Follow us on Twitter @EAPCOnlus – our official congress hashtag is #eapc2015 

 

 

 

 

 

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A PhD in Palliative Care? Why would you want to do that?

Dr Catherine Walshe, Senior Lecturer in Palliative Care and Director of the International Observatory on End of Life Care, Lancaster University, UK

Dr Catherine Walshe

Dr Catherine Walshe

Why would anyone want to embark on a three-year (or more) PhD process involving serious amounts of soul-searching, head scratching and self-doubt? A question I frequently asked myself whilst completing my own PhD some years ago whilst also juggling other life demands. However, despite that reality check, here I am advocating just such an academic programme for many more colleagues working in palliative care. Why would I do that?

Well, I think there are many reasons why individuals might think about embarking on a PhD programme and why our speciality needs such people with advanced training in research.

It is critically important that we continue to develop research capacity in palliative care. There is an incremental increase in palliative care research published year on year, but not necessarily all of the high quality needed to guide our practice. We don’t just need more research in the field; we need better research too. And for that, it’s critical that people who have a sound training in research and research methods are involved in guiding this expansion.

Research in palliative care is known to have particular challenges. Palliative care serves a heterogeneous population, and provides complex care using multidisciplinary teams to people who are very ill. It is not ethical to involve such populations in research that is poorly designed, and hence cannot deliver the research outcomes promised. To address these issues effectively in research requires a balanced appreciation of the possibilities and difficulties of research in this field. Expertise from others in related fields in guiding our research and development of research methods will always be important, but we also need to ensure this expertise is held within palliative care research as well. Palliative care research therefore needs a wide range of researchers from different basic, social science and clinical backgrounds with excellent preparation in the specifics of palliative care research to enable collaboration, appreciation of, and solutions to research challenges.

All researchers have been challenged to avoid waste in research and for those working with people with life-limiting conditions such potential waste may seem particularly problematic. One of the solutions posed to reduce waste is optimising the training of researchers in research methods and design. Increasingly, the essential building block or basic qualification as a researcher is the PhD. Those working in academic palliative care are critically important in developing the researchers of the future through ensuring the provision of appropriately tailored research degrees.

If you are persuaded that PhD level qualifications are important to the field of palliative care, do you still need persuading that you might be exactly the person to take up this opportunity? If you’ve read this far, then you are probably interested in research, and that’s a vitally important qualification. Are you interested in making a difference to the way that we look after people who are dying, and helping to improve the outcomes of care? Do you have an issue that you are interested in that you would like to study further? Well, I think you might be a strong candidate. Whilst all PhD programmes have minimum academic requirements that you would need to check out, a key factor for success in most PhD programmes is having the interest and drive in the topic to sustain you through the ups and downs of the process.

Where do you turn to next to find out more?
Many academic institutions working in palliative care are also involved in the preparation of the next generation of PhD trained researchers. My own institution, the International Observatory on End of Life Care  at Lancaster University, offers a blended learning part-time PhD in Palliative Care for example, which can be studied from anywhere in the world. Full-time funded PhD opportunities are also available.

There are also other international and national PhD programmes. Find-a-PhD might be helpful to start off your search for funded PhDs, or just ‘google’ PhD in Palliative Care. Get to know what it’s like to be a PhD student by browsing the #PhDchat on twitter perhaps?

 

EAPC congress 2015

Are you coming to Copenhagen?
See you at the 14th World Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care – Copenhagen, Denmark, 8-10 May, 2015.  Follow us on Twitter @EAPCOnlus – our official congress hashtag is #eapc2015 

Tienes pensado venir a Copenhague?
Te esperamos en el 14º Congreso Mundial de la Sociedad Europea de Cuidados Paliativos – Copenhague, Dinamarca, del 8 al 10 de Mayo 2015. Consulta toda la información aquí.  También puedes seguirnos en Twitter @EAPCOnlus – el hashtag oficial del congreso es #eapc2015 

Posted in EDUCATION & TRAINING, RESEARCH | Tagged | 3 Comments

Building bridges: The surprising world of the EAPC World Congress

EAPC congress 2015Professor Sheila Payne, President of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC), International Observatory on End of Life Care, Lancaster University, UK, suggests how to make the most of attending the EAPC World Congress.

Professor Sheila Payne

Professor Sheila Payne

Over the years, the EAPC World Congresses have hopefully offered a rewarding visual and cognitive experience, with presentations from international leaders and innovators. But more than that, the Congresses offer an opportunity to build bridges, providing a platform for the exchange and union of ideas, a venue where all corners of the wonderfully varied world of palliative care can come together, and reach out beyond the boundaries of discipline, status and country. It is very easy to fall into the trap of assuming that all EAPC World Congresses will be largely the same. We hope that the EAPC World Congress in Copenhagen from 8-10 May 2015 will both surprise and delight you.

The programme is already online – just click here – so this is a good time to check on what sessions you are most interested in attending and plan ahead. We aim to cover a large range of topics from translational research, physical symptom management and clinical care, to ethics, policy development and public health systems. The aim is to ensure there is something on the programme for everyone. The programme is designed to be covered in a number of different formats.

The EAPC stand is a central point for exchanging information. Amelia Giordano (head office) talking to Prof Carlo Leget (Co-chair, EAPC Spiritual Care Taskforce) and Rev Dr Andrew Goodhead of St Christopher's Hospice, UK

The EAPC stand is a central point for exchanging information. Amelia Giordano (head office) talking to Prof Carlo Leget (Co-chair, EAPC Spiritual Care Taskforce) and (left) Rev Dr Andrew Goodhead, Spiritual Care Lead at St Christopher’s Hospice, UK. Picture: EAPC.

Plenary speakers are highly respected international experts who have been asked to provide an overview of their area. For the first time, we are hosting a debate between two international experts on ‘Individual autonomy versus relational autonomy in the context of clinical care in different parts of Europe’.

Parallel sessions were selected from submitted proposals and focus on specialised topics delivered by well-known experts. For example, in the session ‘Assessing and managing breathlessness in palliative care’, pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches will be discussed and tools for assessment appraised. Some of these sessions present the work of funded research programmes or outcomes from EAPC taskforces. They are a great way to update your knowledge, learn about cutting-edge science or hotly debated topics. Why not try something new?

Meet-the-expert sessions were selected from submitted proposals and focus on specific topics presented by two facilitators. These sessions are designed to be more informal and interactive with a wide range of topics including: ‘Improving spiritual care in clinical practice’, ‘What is known about specialist education for palliative medicine’; and many more. Come to the sessions early to secure your place.

are an excellent way to share research work and clinical innovations.

Poster viewing at the EAPC World Congress in Prague 2013 – scientific posters are an excellent way to share research work and clinical innovations. Picture: EAPC.

Free communication is the rather odd title for the majority of sessions that were selected from more than 1,000 submitted abstracts. People submitting abstracts could choose whether to submit their work as a poster or as a free communication. The highest scoring 120 abstracts were then selected to be presented as oral papers. These were then grouped into conceptually similar themes such as ‘assessment and measurement tools’, ‘ethics’, ‘palliative care in non-cancer’ and many more.

Scientific posters were selected from the good scoring abstracts. These are an excellent way to share research work and clinical innovations. The programme scheduling allows time for poster viewing.

Exhibitors will be displaying the latest in scientific equipment and pharmaceutical preparations. There will be sponsored scientific symposia to highlight key developments. There will also be publishers present to enable you to browse the latest books and journals. The EAPC stand is easily recognisable in its green livery. Please visit us to learn more about the EAPC and to meet our team including Dr Julie Ling, the new EAPC Chief Executive.  

Are you coming to Copenhagen?
See you at the 14th World Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care,  Copenhagen, Denmark, 8-10 May, 2015. Follow us on Twitter @EAPCOnlus – our official congress hashtag is #eapc2015 

Vous venez à Copenhague?
Nous aurons le plaisir de vous accueillir au 14ième Congrès Mondial de l’Association Européenne de Soins Palliatifs  à Copenhague au Danemark, du 8 au 10 mai 2015. Suivez-nous sur Twitter @EAPCOnlus avec le hashtag officiel #eapc2015

Posted in EAPC ACTIVITIES, EAPC Congresses | Leave a comment

Identifying patients with sensory impairment within a hospice setting

Dr Jalila Ibrahim, a second-year General Practice Specialist Trainee at St Ann’s Hospice and Stockport NHS Trust, UK, explains the background to her longer article published in the January/February issue of the European Journal of Palliative Care.

Dr Jalila Ibrahim

Dr Jalila Ibrahim

St Ann’s Hospice in Manchester, is a very busy and much-prized hospice. It serves the local community providing invaluable inpatient facilities, outpatient clinics as well as day activities and therapies to encourage patients to remain sociable during their stay and to allow for easy access to specialist doctors. As a junior doctor, I have worked within many different specialities but never before had I truly noted the importance of clear and effective communication.

Those patients seen within Palliative Medicine are often struggling with complex physical, social and emotional symptoms. Although difficult conversations become more ‘normal’ for us, the healthcare professionals, we can never fully understand the true extent of the distress to the patient. By optimising the conditions in which we have these conversations, we can allow patients to actively and comfortably participate in their personal management plan so that as healthcare professionals we can fully address their ideas, concerns and expectations.

I found that many of the hospice patients were hard of hearing and could not fully understand or follow important conversations. Visual impairment was also widespread but not addressed and so written information became useless to some patients. After review of previous research, I found that there were few studies related to the prevalence of these impairments. As well as this, national statistics estimated that the prevalence of sensory impairment (hearing impairment, visual impairment or mixed impairment) is increasing due to the extended ageing of the population. In November 2013, my colleagues and I decided it would be a useful exercise to audit the number of patients within the inpatient unit who suffered from a sensory impairment, whether the impairment was identified on admission and whether any steps were taken to ensure the patient could communicate and limit the effects of their impairment.

The results were far from ideal:

  • Sensory impairment was prevalent amongst 58% of inpatients
  • Visual impairment was the most prevalent type of impairment (55%) amongst these patients
  • The lack of questioning on initial assessment resulted in just 64% of those who had an impairment, being identified.

There are ways in which the effects of the patients’ impairment can be minimised. Use of magnifying glasses, and large-print written material can help those who suffer from a visual impairment. For those with hearing impairment, pocket talkers can be used to amplify sound. Visual aids and interpreters are useful for patients with more profound deafness. We recommend mandatory staff training in order to improve the identification of affected patients, including information on the various resources that can be made available to facilitate communication. We also recommend a thorough documentation of sensory impairment at the time of admission.

With these steps, we hope that we can all help to make even the most difficult conversations, a more positive experience for our patients.

ejpc coverRead a copy of the full article in the European Journal of Palliative Care
This post relates to a longer article, ‘Identifying patients with sensory impairment within a hospice setting’ by Jalila Ibrahim, Alison Phippen, Ashique Ahamed and Samantha Kay, published in the January/February 2015 issue of the European Journal of Palliative Care (vol. 22.1). If you have a web-based subscription to the journal you’ll be able to download this issue, plus all articles in the journal archive. You can also browse the archive and download articles by taking a 10-minute or 30-minute subscription. Members of the EAPC receive discounted subscription rates to the journal – click here to subscribe online. 

 

EAPC congress 2015

Are you coming to Copenhagen?
See you at the 14th World Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care – Copenhagen, Denmark, 8-10 May, 2015.  Follow us on Twitter @EAPCOnlus – our official congress hashtag is #eapc2015 

Veniți la Copenhaga?
Vă așteptăm să participați la cel de-al 14-lea Congres Mondial al Asociației Europene pentru Îngrijiri Paliative  – Copenhaga, Danemarca, 8-10 Mai, 2015. Urmăriți-ne pe Twitter @EAPCOnlus – hashtag-ul official al congresului este #eapc2015 

Posted in EAPC-LINKED JOURNALS, European Journal of Palliative Care, PATIENT & FAMILY CARE, RESEARCH | Tagged | Leave a comment

Dawn of a new era – or a false dawn?

Richard A Powell, a Global Health Researcher based in Nairobi, Kenya, and former Director of Learning and Research, African Palliative Care Association, Kampala, Uganda.

Richard A Powell

Richard A Powell

The profile of palliative care has increased thanks to commendable global advocacy work – the high point being the landmark resolution passed by the World Health Assembly in May 2014. And yet, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) agenda has been comparatively overlooked. Sustainable Development Goals are a set of 17 international development goals and 164 targets that address a diverse range of sustainable development issues, from health to the protection of oceans and forests.

The importance of palliative care in the Sustainable Development Goals agenda was recently outlined in a commentary written by 12 recognised palliative care experts in the February edition of The Lancet Oncology.1 The paper, acknowledging the relative absence of palliative care from the global health dialogue, urges that the discipline should be incorporated into the SDG agenda.

The authors argue that the SDG health goal (to “Ensure healthy lives and promote wellbeing for all at all ages”) should include reference to palliative care, especially in two specific sub-targets. These sub-targets are 3.8, concerning the achievement of universal health coverage, and 3.9b, which aims to “support research and development of vaccines and medicines for the communicable and non-communicable diseases that primarily affect developing countries, [and] provide access to affordable essential medicines and vaccines …”

logo The Sustainable Development Goals agenda originated at the 2012 United Nations’ Conference on Sustainable Development held in Rio de Janeiro (Rio+20), and the goals have now succeeded the Millennium Development Goals. Not only will the specific deliverables forge the political agenda for world health for the next 15 years, but crucially they will also guide national governments in the prioritisation of their domestic agendas to meet internationally agreed expectations. And that prioritisation is vital because potentially it will lead to the allocation of funds to achieve the goals.

While proposing an indicator that is relevant to the above sub-targets – i.e., morphine-equivalent consumption per capita – the authors readily acknowledge that it does not in any way capture the holistic nature of palliative care. However, it does ensure that, as an essential aspect of a functioning health system, palliative care is represented, providing a leverage point for advocates to advance the fuller agenda: integration of palliative care within public health systems.

The SDGs are hugely important and will underpin the global dialogue. Palliative care must become an integral part of that conversation, with internationally coordinated advocacy among policy makers and global health and development agencies. In this way, we can ensure that the sun on our collective horizon is truly the dawn of a new era and not a false dawn.

Reference

  1. Powell RA, Mwangi-Powell FN, Radbruch L, Yamey G, Krakauer EL, Spence D, Ali Z, Baxter S, De Lima L, Xhixha A, Rajagopal MR, Knaul F. Putting palliative care on the global health agenda. Lancet Oncol 2015 Feb;16 (2):131-133.  

(You can download this article free of charge but you will need to login or take out a free registration). 

 

 

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Toolkit for the development of palliative care in the community

Professor Scott A Murray, Chair of the European Association for Palliative Care Taskforce in Primary Palliative Care; University of Edinburgh, UK, explains the background to a longer article selected as this month’s Editor’s Choice in Palliative Medicine.

Professor Scott Murray

Professor Scott Murray

We live in exciting times for palliative care in general and for palliative care in the community in particular. The World Health Organization (WHO) in May 2014 passed its first ever resolution about palliative care. It called for palliative care to be integrated into health care in all settings, especially in the community. 1

Ten years ago Prof Geoff Mitchell and I decided on his patio, one warm evening in Brisbane, Australia, that it was high time to re-emphasise the potential of palliative care in the community. That night the International Primary Palliative Care Network was born.

Our enthusiastic band has grown over the years, meeting at palliative care and also primary care conferences to develop the strategic interface between the two. Now we have members in more than 40 countries in every continent and have, as a group, published articles encouraging countries from Singapore to Germany to Lebanon to develop primary palliative care. 2-4

Recently we were tasked by the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) to produce a toolkit to facilitate the development of palliative care in the community. The World Organization of Family Physicians (WONCA) has endorsed the toolkit, and highlighted it at the World Health Assembly in May 2014 as a means whereby palliative care can be integrated into primary health care.

The toolkit’s development is described in our longer article in Palliative Medicine and is freely available via the links below. It is a collation of documents and guidance based on the four domains of the WHO public health strategy for palliative care: policy, education, implementation and drug availability. The resource highlights how palliative care in the community needs to develop alongside specialist palliative care provision to ensure adequate provision of palliative care across all diseases and settings. We also demonstrated great variability in community-based palliative care across Europe. This snapshot lays the groundwork for progress in all countries, and a benchmark by which progress can be measured.

This toolkit will help support individuals and organisations worldwide seeking to further develop palliative care services in primary care settings. Copies of the short toolkit in English, French and German are available to download (see link below). The toolkit comes with many active web links to documents which detail various helpful national policies, practices, and tools so that patients can be identified for palliative care (and then be assessed and cared for. Countries can learn from what has worked well previously in other similar countries to fast-forward palliative care in their communities.

The current strong WHO advocacy for palliative care and this practical toolkit should greatly help many of us to develop palliative care in the community. Do contact a member of the EAPC Taskforce in Primary Palliative Care if you would like any advice or support, and please also join our International Primary Palliative Care Network (see links below). And if you are attending the EAPC 2015 World Congress in Copenhagen please come and contribute to our Taskforce session on Saturday, 9 May at 4.30pm. 

pall med cover FebDownload a free copy of the full article…
This post relates to a longer article, ‘Promoting palliative care in the community: Production of the primary palliative care toolkit by the European Association of Palliative Care Taskforce in primary palliative care’ by Murray SA, Firth A, Schneider N, Van den Eynden B, Gomez-Batiste X, Brogaard T, et al. published in Palliat Med. 2015 Feb;29(2):101-11. EAPC members and registered users of the EAPC website can download a free copy of this article and other ‘Editor’s choice’ papers from the EAPC website. (If you need to register or login to download this paper please follow the instructions in the top right-hand corner of EAPC home page and scroll down to the article). Click here to view other EAPC-originated papers.

Links and resources

References

  1. WHA. Strengthening of palliative care as a component of integrated treatment within the continuum of care. 134th Session of the World Health Assembly. EB134.R7 May. 2014.
  2. Schneider N, Mitchell G, Murray SA. Ambulante Palliativversorgung: Der Hausarzt als erster Ansprechpartner. Dtsch Arztebl International. 2010 May 14, 2010;107(19):925-.
  3. Murray SA, Osman H. Primary palliative care: the potential of primary care physicians as providers of palliative care in the community in the Eastern Mediterranean region. East Mediterr Health J. 2012 Feb;18(2):178-83. PubMed PMID: 22571096. Epub 2012/05/11. eng.
  4. Murray SA, Kok JY. Internationally, it is time to bridge the gap between primary and secondary healthcare services for the dying. Ann Acad Med Singapore. 2008 Feb;37(2):142-4. PubMed PMID: 18327351. Epub 2008/03/11. eng.

EAPC congress 2015

Are you coming to Copenhagen? Register now before Early Bird registration closes on 15 February!
See you at the 14th World Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care – Copenhagen, Denmark, 8-10 May, 2015. Follow us on Twitter @EAPCOnlus – our official congress hashtag is #eapc2015 

Vous venez à Copenhague?
Nous aurons le plaisir de vous accueillir au 14ième Congrès Mondial de l’Association Européenne de Soins Palliatifs à Copenhague au Danemark, du 8 au 10 mai 2015. Suivez-nous sur Twitter @EAPCOnlus avec le hashtag officiel #eapc2015

Posted in EAPC Taskforces/special projects, EAPC-LINKED JOURNALS, Palliative Medicine: Editor's Choice | Tagged | Leave a comment