Expand your network, improve your research career in palliative care – join us at the Junior Forum session of the EAPC Research Network at #EAPC2020

WELCOME TO #EAPC2020 – THE 11TH EAPC WORLD RESEARCH CONGRESS 2020 – WITH LIVE INTERACTIVE ONLINE SESSIONS 7 TO 9 OCTOBER AND ON-DEMAND CONTENT ONLINE FROM 21 SEPTEMBER

Ahead of the congress, we’re delighted to give a glimpse of what’s in store at #EAPC2020. Today, Augusto Caraceni (Chair), Geana Paula Kurita and Luc Deliens (Vice-chairs) of the European Association for Palliative Care Research Network (EAPC RN), introduce the work of the Junior Forum and invite you to join them and other colleagues in a live interactive session on 8 October 2020.

Clockwise, l-r: Augusto Craceni, Geana Paula Kurita and Luc Deliens.

The EAPC Research Network Junior Forum (JF) was established in 2008 with the aim of helping junior researchers (young researchers and those who are relatively new to research in palliative care) to become an integral part of the international research scene in palliative care, providing them with possibilities of connecting and working with colleagues worldwide. In just 13 days’ time, we will look forward to welcoming you to a dedicated online Junior Forum session at the 11th European Association for Palliative Care World Research Congress Online. The session will take place on Thursday 8 October 2020, at 7:00-7:50pm CET (View the full interactive programme here). Invited speakers include Professor Eduardo Bruera (MD Anderson Cancer Center) and Dr Eva Schildmann, one of the recipients of the EAPC RN Early Career Researcher Award 2020.

Advice on how to be a successful researcher, and challenges and strategies in improving research skills will be discussed. In addition, the last part of the session will be open for information and discussion regarding Junior Forum aims and activities.

How to join and get the most from the Junior Forum live session

To join this event, you just need to be registered for the main congress and no additional registration is necessary. If you haven’t yet registered for the congress, please register here. We encourage you to view the presentations ahead of the live panel session and to submit questions to the speakers regarding their research. The  congress platform is now live and open to all registered delegates –  just follow the instructions to submit your questions. (All registered delegates were sent an email earlier this week with a unique login to access the platform. It’s an automatically generated email with the subject heading ‘Admin user via (EAPC)’ so please check your Spam folder if it is not in your inbox, or email info@eapcnet.eu).

Who can join the Junior Forum – and what do you get from it?

Researchers and/or clinicians interested in expanding their network and improving their research career in palliative and end-of-life care are welcome to join the Junior Forum. We want to help junior researchers to become an integral part of the international research scene in palliative care, and to help you build up your connections and contacts.

To join the Junior Forum, please complete the application form on the JF webpage and email the Research Network Secretary, Alice Gallivanone.

The EAPC Research Network has been developing an ambitious new programme of activities for the Junior Forum:

  1. Organisation of reference research groups. These groups will develop educational activities and provide support to junior researchers under supervision of senior advisors/colleagues.
  2. Networking with International Research Centres to encourage them to offer opportunities for short duration research placements.
  3. Organisation of a JF session at all future EAPC congresses.

We are looking forward to meeting you all at the online Junior Forum Session on Thursday 8 October at 7pm CET. Remember that the presentations are now available on the congress platform and please pose your questions for the live interactive panel discussion.

Meanwhile, we’d also like to encourage all you researchers to consider entering this year’s Science Slam at #EAPC2020. Read more here and on the EAPC blog.

Links

  • More about the EAPC Research Network Junior Forum here.
  • Follow our Facebook page here.

Keep up to date with latest #EAPC2020 congress news on the EAPC blog.


IT’S NOT TOO LATE TO REGISTER… JOIN PALLIATIVE CARE SPECIALISTS FROM ACROSS THE WORLD AT #EAPC2020 – 11th EAPC WORLD RESEARCH CONGRESS ONLINE 2020.

Masses of on-demand content now available until 31 January 2021. Interactive online sessions 7 to 9 October 2020. 

A blend of: On-demand Sessions, Live Presentations, Live Panels hosted by international experts, Children’s Seminar, Poster Sessions, and EAPC Group Meetings will bring you all of the latest research from the world’s top researchers in palliative care. CME accreditation will be available. Learn and interact with leading researchers and chat with other registered delegates from the global palliative care community – all in the safety of your own home or office. Visit the congress website and register here.

IMPORTANT NOTICE If you are already registered for the congress you should by now have received an email with your personal login to access the congress platform. It’s an automatically generated email with the subject heading ‘Admin user via (EAPC)’. Please do check your Spam folder if you cannot see it in your inbox, or  email info@eapcnet.eu

Posted in 11th EAPC World Research Congress Online, EAPC World Research Congresses, RESEARCH | Tagged | Leave a comment

‘This is your golden time. You enjoy it and you’ve plenty time for crying after’: How dysphagia impacts family caregivers of people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

WE’RE DELIGHTED TO PRESENT THIS MONTH’S ‘EDITOR’S CHOICE’ FROM PALLIATIVE MEDICINE, THE OFFICIAL RESEARCH JOURNAL OF THE EAPC. 

Each month, Professor Catherine Walshe, Editor-in-Chief of ‘Palliative Medicine’, chooses an article that readers may find particularly interesting or useful and invites the authors to draw out the key points on the EAPC blog. Focusing on research that is novel, a robust review, from a specific country or just slightly left of field, the ‘Editor’s Choice’ post aims to share experience and stimulate ideas. We hope you’ll read the longer article in ‘Palliative Medicine’, or EAPC members can access a free copy from the EAPC website.

Today, Dominika Lisiecka, PhD, Lecturer, Department of Nursing and Healthcare Sciences, Institute of Technology Tralee, Ireland, gives the background to her longer article selected as Editor’s Choice in the September issue of  ‘Palliative Medicine’.


Dominika Lisiecka.

My journey with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) started approximately 15 years ago when I was working in an acute hospital in Ireland. As a newly qualified speech and language therapist I was often overwhelmed with the complexity of the management of this disease. In line with my professional background, I was focusing on both communication and swallowing impairments (dysphagia), but the medical safety that can be impacted by dysphagia was a clear priority for me at that time.

Later on, people living with ALS taught me how to respect their quality of life and balance risks related to dysphagia. I often thought about the caregivers, always present in my office but situated in the background. I had limited clinical resources and no time to investigate their journey, my focus was supporting the person with ALS. My interest in the caregivers of people with ALS continued to grow over the years and I knew that my PhD research would include this population.

In 2015, my research project investigating the experiences of dysphagia for both people with ALS and their caregivers was awarded a research fellowship from the Health Research Board in Ireland. I was fortunate to work with Dr Helen Kelly and Prof Jeanne Jackson (both from University College Cork) as my supervisors. Part of our research culminated in the article recently published in ‘Palliative Medicine’: ‘This is your golden time. You enjoy it and you’ve plenty time for crying after’: How dysphagia impacts family caregivers of people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis – a qualitative study. This article presents data collected through multiple interviews and observations of family caregivers of people living with ALS and dysphagia. Data analysis revealed that ALS significantly transformed the lives of the caregivers. They were unsure how the disease was going to progress and had to balance their caregiving duties with other obligations and family responsibilities. They were often exhausted, lonely, and frustrated. Despite their best efforts it was not possible to stop the deterioration of their loved one or to cure ALS.

How did the presence of progressive dysphagia influence their lives? The caregivers were very aware of the risks associated with dysphagia and attempted to constantly support the person with ALS during meals. They were afraid of the probability of their loved one choking and were unsure how to mange any choking episodes at home. Their own relationship with food was affected; food was no longer a source of pleasure but something dangerous.

Kay: Because she [her mother] could be sitting on there and she’d be coughing and next minute you’d have to tap her on the back and I’d be going Jesus is it stuck? (…) You were uneasy all the time when she was eating because do you know you’d be kind of watching was it going down or was it staying and getting stuck. (lines 248-253)

What is the relevance of our paper for healthcare professionals? It describes how dysphagia affects caregivers of people with ALS and how it disrupts their lives. The caregivers’ ability to cope with dysphagia depends on many factors. As caregivers are often the key people supporting the person with ALS and carrying out professionals’ recommendations, their work should be recognised.

Healthcare professionals should not only focus on the person with ALS when managing dysphagia, but also consider and include the needs of the caregivers.

Links

DOWNLOAD A COPY OF THE FULL ARTICLE IN PALLIATIVE MEDICINE

This post relates to the longer article, ‘This is your golden time. You enjoy it and you’ve plenty time for crying after’: How dysphagia impacts family caregivers of people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis – A qualitative study, by D Lisiecka, H Kelly, J Jackson; published in Palliative Medicine  2020, Vol. 34 (8), pages:1097-1107. Article first published online June 17, 2020. Issue published September 2020.  https://doi.org/10.1177/0269216320932754


EAPC MEMBERS – DOWNLOAD THIS, AND ALL OTHER ‘EDITOR’S CHOICE’ ARTICLES, FREE OF CHARGE

If you are currently an Individual or Associate EAPC Member you have full access to the EAPC website, and the chance to download a free PDF of all ‘Editor’s choice’ articles and many other papers too. Just click here, enter your email address and membership password and choose from the list of journal articles.

How to join as an Individual/Associate Member, or to renew your membership

  • Click here to join as an Associate or Individual Member, or to renew membership. (Choose relevant national palliative care association if you wish to register free of charge as an Associate Member).
  • Now login with your email address and password and choose from the list of articles.

Note: You can apply to be an Associate Member FREE of charge provided that you are a member of your country’s national palliative care association, and that the association is an EAPC National Association member.

IT’S NOT TOO LATE TO REGISTER… JOIN PALLIATIVE CARE SPECIALISTS FROM ACROSS THE WORLD AT #EAPC2020 – 11th EAPC WORLD RESEARCH CONGRESS ONLINE 2020. Congress platform goes live on 21 September with on-demand content.  Interactive online sessions 7 to 9 October 2020

A blend of Pre-recorded On-demand Sessions, Live Presentations, Live Panels hosted by international experts, Children’s Seminar, Poster Sessions, and EAPC Group Meetings will bring you the latest cutting-edge research from the world’s top researchers in palliative and end-of-life care. CME accreditation will be available. Masses of content will be available on demand from late September until January 2021. Be a part of the first-ever EAPC World Research Congress Online. Learn and interact with leading researchers and chat with other registered delegates from the global palliative care community – all in the safety of your own home or office.
Meet some of our plenary speakers on the EAPC YouTube channel.

IMPORTANT MESSAGE
If you have already registered for the congress you will receive personal login details via email – today. The email will be generated automatically so it’s vital to check your Spam! If you have not received an email by 4pm CET on Tuesday 22 September, please contact info@eapcnet.eu

Posted in Carers, EAPC-LINKED JOURNALS, Neurology, Palliative Medicine: Editor's Choice, PATIENT & FAMILY CARE | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Ten EAPC Task Forces and Reference Groups go live at #EAPC2020

Last week, we suggested how to get the most out of the EAPC World Research Congress Online. Today, the EAPC head office team invite you to meet ten of the EAPC’s Task Forces and Reference Groups in live interactive meetings that are taking place from 7 to 9 October 2020.


Pictured are the chairs of the EAPC Task Forces that are holding Open Meetings at the congress. Clockwise l-r: Peter Pype, Lieve Van den Block, Cristina Monforte-Royo, Raymond Voltz, Lizzie Chambers, Ana Lacerda, Leena Pelttari, Ros Scott, Mary Turner, Aline Chassagne, Joan Marston and Lucas Radbruch.

Everyday we’re adding more final touches to the 11th World Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) which, for the first time, will be online on 7 to 9 October 2020. But even before then – on Monday 21 September– our congress platform will go live with masses of on-demand content to view. All registered delegates will receive a unique login to access the platform on this date so keep an eye on your inbox. And please check your Spam just in case the email is wrongly diverted!

Meanwhile, we’re delighted that ten of the EAPC’s Task Forces and Reference Groups will be hosting Open Meetings as part of the live interactive programme on 7 to 9 October. In this post, we’ll explain a little more about our task forces and reference groups and the important role they perform within the EAPC, and we encourage you to attend the Open Meetings.

The EAPC’s core values emphasise the importance of influencing, promoting and advocating for the delivery of high-quality palliative care by developing and sharing palliative care education, research, policy and evidence-based practice. And at the heart of everything we do is dissemination – dissemination to our members and, more widely, to the many other people who support us by presenting at and attending our congresses, contributing to EAPC white papers and our blog and much else. 

But what you may not know is how that information is collated – how it comes alive and pops up on our website, on our blog or in your inbox! Much of the information the EAPC produces comes from our hardworking task forces and reference groups. EAPC Task Forces are formed by interested EAPC members, from a range of disciplines and different countries, who work together to deliver on focused, time-limited projects. Some task forces have evolved into EAPC Reference Groups with a broader scope of work and the ability to deliver on multiple projects.

Behind every successful organisation there’s a task force or reference group…

We currently have 20 task forces whose remits range from Advance Care Planning in Dementia to the very latest, Palliative Care and Wound Care. And in addition, there are now eight reference groups – from Ageing and Palliative Care to Spiritual Care.

Broadly speaking, the groups share a common goal: to develop international networks for professionals who want to improve palliative care in a specific area, for example for people in minority communities such as people with intellectual disabilities, prisoners, refugees and migrants or those involved in public health, clinical issues, bereavement, family care. You name it – our task forces and reference groups have it covered! They identify examples of best practice internationally, develop evidence-based guidance and share and disseminate it, often via the publication of an EAPC white paper. Many groups have produced toolkits or guidance that has been translated and adapted for use in different cultures.

Pictured are the chairs of the EAPC Reference Groups that are holding Open Meetings at the congress. Clockwise l-r: David Oliver, Rachel Forrester-Jones, Irene Tuffrey-Wijne, Scott Murray, Sébastien Moine, Marie-José Gijsberts and Bella Vivat.

Join EAPC groups live at the World Research Congress

Now you have the chance to meet ten of our EAPC Task Forces and Reference Groups in live interactive discussions by joining them in their Open Meetings at the EAPC World Research Congress Online. Details are listed below, together with links to their web pages. (More groups may request Open Meetings so please check the live interactive programme for latest information).

Meet EAPC Task Forces at their Open Meetings

Children and Young People 2pm CET, Wednesday 7 October 2020. Chairs: Lizzie Chambers and Ana Lacerda.

Healthcare Guidelines 11am CET, Thursday 8 October 2020. Chairs: Dr Peter Pype and Prof Lieve Van den Block.

Refugees and Migrants 5pm CET, Wednesday 7 October 2020. Chairs: Joan Marston and Prof Lukas Radbruch.

Mapping Palliative Care Provision for Prisoners in Europe 11am CET, Friday 9 October 2020. Chairs: Dr Mary Turner and Dr Aline Chassagne.

Volunteering 11am CET, Wednesday 7 October 2020. Chairs: Ros Scott and Leena Pelttari.

Wish to Hasten Death – 11am CET, 7 Wednesday 2020. Chairs: Dr Cristina Monforte-Royo and Prof Raymond Voltz.

Meet EAPC Reference Groups at their Open Meetings

Neurology 2pm CET, Wednesday 7 October 2020. Chair: Prof David Oliver.

Intellectual Disability 2pm CET, Friday 9 October 2020. Chairs: Prof Irene Tuffrey-Wijne and Prof Rachel Forrester-Jones.

Primary Palliative Care 2pm CET, Friday 9 October 2020. Chairs: Prof Scott Murray and Dr Sébastien Moine.

Spiritual Care 11am CET, Thursday 8 October 2020. Chairs: Dr Marie-José Gijsberts and Bella Vivat.

Please come along to the groups’ Open Meetings on 7 to 9 October and learn more about their activities, achievements and future projects.

Are you interested in setting up a task force or reference group? You can find more details here or email us here.

 Links

  • View all 20 EAPC Task Forces here, or visit the EAPC website and follow the links to EAPC Groups.
  • View all eight EAPC Reference Groups here.
  • Read posts from EAPC Task Forces and Reference Groups on the EAPC blog.

Read more posts about the 11th EAPC World Research Congress on the EAPC blog.


It’s not too late to register… Join palliative care specialists from across the world at the 11th World Research Congress Online of the European Association for Palliative Care. Interactive online sessions 7 to 9 October 2020 and on-demand content available from 21 September to 31 January 2021.

A blend of Pre-recorded On-demand Sessions, Live Presentations, Live Panels hosted by international experts, Children’s Seminar,Meet the Expert,Poster Sessions and EAPC Group Meetings, will bring you all the latest research from the world’s top researchers in palliative and end-of-life care. CME accreditation will be available. Meet some of our plenary speakers on the EAPC YouTube channel. View/download the full programme here. Register here.

Posted in 11th EAPC World Research Congress Online, EAPC Task Forces/Reference Groups, EAPC World Research Congresses | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

QELCA © – Transforming care at end of life globally

Last year on this blog, Dr Heather Richardson, Joint CEO of St Christopher’s Hospice in London, UK, described how St Christopher’s education programme was changing to reflect contemporary opportunities and challenges. Today, Liz Bryan, Education Consultant at St Christopher’s, explains how the QELCA © Train the Trainer programme contributes to new ways of delivering quality end-of-life care.

Liz Bryan (centre) pictured with Members of  The Living Will Promotion Association that has successfully implemented the QELCA© Train the Trainer programme across China.

From Beijing to Buenos Aires, end-of-life care is changing as health and social care organisations consider the benefits of a palliative model over a curative one. Multi-disciplinary teams are rising to the challenge of delivering quality end-of-life care to the growing ageing population globally. One example of this change is not a traditional palliative care education programme, but a flexible, leadership and change management programme tailored to the needs of every individual who participates and their organisation: QELCA© (Quality End of Life Care for All).

The QELCA© programme began in 2008 at St Christopher’s Hospice in London, when I was approached by an acute hospital which needed to improve care for dying patients. Rather than facilitate practice placements, I proposed an alternative way for the team to learn how best to care for this patient group: a five-day programme that would include three days in the classroom and two clinical days.

This cohort, and the dozens that have followed since then, were asked to consider what they would want if they were dying, to relay their personal experiences of caring for the dying, to reflect on the most important things they learned in the clinical setting and then to set priorities for change. The QELCA© Trainers then supported participants to complete an action plan to be delivered over six months, during which time the group met to assess progress on their priorities for change – for them, their team and their organisation.

Thanks to the QELCA© TtT (Train the Trainer) programme, the QELCA© programme is now successfully growing globally with three satellites in the UK and five across the globe in China, South Korea, Argentina, Brazil and Canada. The Living Will Promotion Association, a social movement organisation in China, initially sent one doctor to St Christopher’s to complete the QELCA© TtT  programme. Five years on, and there are now 66 trained trainers representing more than 30 organisations across China.

Most organisations that sign up for the QELCA© TtT programme do so with the intention of becoming a QELCA© satellite, giving them the platform to further cascade quality end-of-life care in their country or region. Before deciding whether to become a satellite, an organisation will send at least two staff members to train as QELCA© Trainers. All new QELCA© Trainers, as a requirement for registration, have to critically reflect on their first programme and submit an assignment for assessment and certification. All satellites are represented on a QELCA© Research and Development Forum; this ensures a standardisation of approach to delivery while also exploring opportunities to gather further evidence of its impact.

In Argentina, Marcela Specos, the Director of Education at a hospice in Buenos Aires, told me that she felt that sending a clinical team into the hospitals to share palliative care skills could not deliver the cultural change that was required. She realised that it is not a question of ‘injecting’ the hospice model into a hospital, but rather helping each institution understand their own needs and priorities. In January 2020, Marcela and two colleagues completed the QELCA© Train the trainer programme via Zoom.

Although initially sceptical, Marcella felt that using Zoom proved a bonus, saying, “When we closed down Zoom at the end of the session, because we were in our setting, I could immediately speak to members of my team [and] reflect with colleagues about ways we could implement things.”

Even before the coronavirus pandemic, the Action Learning element of QELCA© and QELCA© TtT were offered via Zoom by St Christopher’s. The international accessibility of Zoom has made it a preferred communication tool for satellites and this digital flexibility has allowed each satellite to make its own adjustments based on national and local social distancing guidelines.

Subsequently, Marcella and her colleagues were in a strong position to answer a call for help from a major hospital in Buenos Aires to prepare for large numbers of Covid-19 deaths. As Marcella explained to me:

“You give them the framework and show them the range of tools that are available. You let them describe what it is they want to build. Once they’ve identified what they want to change, then together we make an action plan. You are very conscious that participants have to look for the knowledge for themselves, but you can see the results on the first day.”

To find out more…

The next QELCA© Train the Trainer programme will be delivered online in September 2020. There will be more in 2021. As QELCA© trainers deliver the programme in pairs, it’s essential they complete the course in pairs too.

For more information please contact Liz Bryan or view more here

Links


It’s not too late to register… Join palliative care specialists from across the world at the 11th World Research Congress Online of the European Association for Palliative Care. Interactive online sessions take place 7 to 9 October 2020 and on-demand content is available from 21 September 2020 to 31 January 2021.

All registered delegates will receive a unique login to access the platform on the day the congress goes live on 21 September – so keep an eye on your inbox! 

A blend of Pre-recorded On-demand Sessions, Live Presentations, Live Panels hosted by international experts, Children’s Seminar, Meet the Expert, Poster Sessions and EAPC Group Meetings, will bring you all the latest research from the world’s top researchers in palliative and end-of-life care. CME accreditation will be available. Meet some of our plenary speakers on the EAPC YouTube channel. Find out more and view/download the full programme here. Register here.

Posted in EDUCATION & TRAINING | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Becoming a research expert in paediatric palliative care: 10 top tips at the Meet-the-Experts session #EAPC2020

Only 23 days to #EAPC2020 … The 11th World Research Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care which, for the first time, will take place online with live interactive sessions on 7 to 9 October.

Professor Joanne Wolfe (USA) and Professor Myra Bluebond-Langner (UK) are known across the world for their work in children’s palliative care. Here they welcome you to join them at the Meet-the-Experts panel they will be hosting by Zoom on Wednesday 7 October.


Professor Joanne Wolfe (left) and Professor Myra Bluebond-Langner.

We’re delighted to be hosting a Meet-the-Experts panel at the Children’s Palliative Care Seminar at the 11thEAPC World Research Congress Online. The Meet-the- Experts panel will be the final part of the live and interactive children’s seminar programme that will showcase the latest research in children’s palliative care. Our live, interactive panel discussion will start at 8pm CET on 7 October.

This session starts from the simple and obvious premise that experts are not born, but made. It ends with the perhaps only slightly less obvious, and certainly more complex, conclusion that there are a variety of ways to achieve that status – many of which are within your grasp. In fact, we will even offer 10 top tips for making it so.

How will we accomplish our aim?

By telling stories… Over Zoom with a cup of tea or coffee in hand, Joanne Wolfe, Myra Bluebond-Langner and the 12 others who have signed up for this session will share their stories with one another. We will recount our successes, our rejections, the opportunities we took and those we missed, the risks and benefits of our forays and what we learned along the way. Embedded in these narratives are the moral of the stories, or as we say in the trade – the take-home messages. And with a bit of synthesis – the top 10 tips for becoming expert(s) in paediatric palliative care research.

How to join the meeting

The Meet-the-Experts panel takes place online at 8pm-8.50pm CET on Wednesday 7 October. All registered congress participants will be able to listen to the session and share any thoughts using the videoconferencing chat function. Or, you can even be a part of the panel discussion yourself and pose your questions live! If you wish to be among this small cohort of 12 invited registrants, please submit your questions by using the dedicated page on the congress website for our ‘Meet-the-Experts’ session. To access the congress website, all registered congress participants will receive a unique login on the date the congress goes live on 21 September.

We look forward to seeing you at the Meet-the-Experts panel. And please look out for another post later this month telling you more about what you can expect from the Children’s Palliative Care Seminar. Meanwhile, you can view or download the programme for the seminar here. Access to the seminar is free of charge for those attending the 11th EAPC World Research Congress.

More about the authors…

Myra Bluebond-Langner is Professor and True Colours Chair in Palliative Care for Children and Young Peopleat University College London – Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, Louis Dundas Centre, London, UK. Contact Prof Bluebond-Langner by email

Joanne Wolfe MD MPH is Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School,
Director of Palliative Care, Boston Children’s Hospital, Division Chief, Pediatric Palliative Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, USA. Contact Prof Wolfe by email.

Keep up to date with latest #EAPC2020 news and posts via the special series on the EAPC blog.

JOIN PALLIATIVE CARE SPECIALISTS FROM ACROSS THE WORLD AT #EAPC2020 – 11th EAPC WORLD RESEARCH CONGRESS ONLINE 2020 – interactive online sessions 7 to 9 October 2020.

A blend of: On-demand Sessions, Live Presentations, Live Panels hosted by international experts, Children’s Seminar, Poster Sessions, and EAPC Group Meetings will bring you all of the latest research from the world’s top researchers in palliative care. CME accreditation will be available. Masses of content will be available on demand from 21 September until 31 January 2021. Learn and interact with leading researchers and chat with other registered delegates from the global palliative care community – all in the safety of your own home or office. Visit the congress website and register here.

Posted in 11th EAPC World Research Congress Online, CHILDREN'S PALLIATIVE CARE, EAPC World Research Congresses | Tagged , | Leave a comment