How much do we know about what influences place of care and death of older people with advanced dementia?

A team of international researchers, Marjolein Gysels, (The Netherlands), Bridget Johnston (UK), Claudia Bausewein (Germany), Hristina Petkova (UK) and Fliss Murtagh (UK), explain the background to their longer article published in the March/April issue of the European Journal of Palliative Care.

Dr Marjolein Gysels

Dr Marjolein Gysels

In 2006, we undertook a scoping exercise at King’s College London on generalist services for adults at the end of life for the Service Delivery and Organisation Programme (SDO) of The National Institute for Health Research. From this work, the issues on place of care, place of death and transitions in care of people who are dying of non-malignant disease emerged as one of the priorities for future research.

Dr Fliss Murtagh

Dr Fliss Murtagh

Responding to SDO’s call for a systematic review, Fliss Murtagh took on the challenge to lead this review to draw together this huge unexplored area. The review combined the published evidence on preferences for place of care and death, factors influencing place of death and key transitions towards the end of life. The review provided important insights into the complex and inter-related nature of the factors influencing place of death in non-malignant conditions, which allowed the formulation of clear implications for practice, policy and research. These include the importance of giving attention to achieving preferred place of death, wherever that place is; carer support, especially in the context of longer illness trajectories; the imbalance of those with lower socio-economic status who achieve lower rates of home death; advance care planning among older people; and innovative approaches to support those with complex co-morbidities in the community.

Because of the predicted rapid rise in the number of people who will be affected by dementia, and the challenges to care systems which are not attuned to their specific needs, we found it important to write up the insights that emerged from the qualitative evidence. End of life decision-making is a crucial issue for those with dementia and their families. Yet there is a real lack of knowledge and acknowledgement of dementia as a terminal illness. Family carers are called upon to make difficult decisions for patients who lack capacity, but are often unprepared for this, and for the inevitable crises, which adds to the burden of caring.

Early information, open discussions, and advance care planning are imperative. People with dementia often experience multiple transitions throughout their illness and even during one episode. Relocations are unsettling and may even be life threatening. If transitions can be anticipated, considered, and discussed, then these adverse effects may be reduced. Overall, there is a real need for combining expertise from the fields of palliative care and dementia care to help meet the challenges effectively.

EJPC_22_2_coverRead the longer article in European Journal of Palliative Care
This post relates to a longer article, ‘What influences place of care and death of older people with advanced dementia? A systematic review of qualitative evidence’ by Marjolein Gysels, Bridget Johnston, Claudia Bausewein, Hristina Petkova, Fliss Murtagh, published in the March/April 2015 issue of the European Journal of Palliative Care (vol. 22.2).  If you have a web-based subscription to the journal you’ll be able to download this issue, plus all articles in the journal archive. You can also browse the archive and download articles by taking a 10-minute or 30-minute subscription. Members of the EAPC receive discounted subscription rates to the journal – click here to subscribe online.

Links and resources

  • Murtagh FEM et al. Understanding place of death for patients with non malignant conditions: a systematic literature review. Final report. NIHR Service Delivery and Organisation programme; 2012. Available to download as a PDF. (This work presents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The views expressed are those of the authors, and not necessarily those of the UK National Health Service, NIHR or Department of Health).
  • Van der Steen J et al. White paper defining optimal palliative care in older people with dementia: A Delphi study and recommendations from the European Association for Palliative Care. Palliative Medicine 2014, Vol. 28(3) 197–209. Available to download as a PDF from the EAPC website.  

More about the authors
Marjolein Gysels, Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and King’s College London, Department of Palliative Care, UK; Bridget Johnston, University of Nottingham, Sue Ryder Care Centre for the Study of Supportive, Palliative and End of Life Care, Nottingham, UK; Claudia Bausewein, Munich University Hospital, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Germany; Hristina Petkova, King’s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, UK; and Fliss Murtagh, King’s College London, Department of Palliative Care, London, UK.

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EAPC Board elections: Introducing our candidates – Dr Catherine Walshe

This new series introduces candidates for the European Association for Palliative Care Board of Directors who will be standing for election (or in some cases re-election) in May 2015. We hope the blog posts provide an opportunity for candidates to explain more about themselves and how they might contribute to the EAPC and the palliative care community more generally.  Board members are nominated by national associations or, in a few cases, by individual members. They are elected as individuals to service the EAPC for a four-year term, with one additional opportunity to be re-elected. The EAPC is keen to have Board members from all disciplines, at all stages of their career, and from all parts of Europe. 

The series continues today with Dr Catherine Walshe, Senior Lecturer in Palliative Care and Director of the International Observatory on End of Life Care, Lancaster University, UK.

Dr Catherine Walshe

Dr Catherine Walshe

It was nearly 20 years ago, but I still carry with me the memory of being with one of my patients at the moment of her death, at home, surrounded by her family. I had nursed her for a year or more before she died, and had reflected often in that time on my approach to palliative care because of her inspirational attitude to managing life and her impending death. I wanted to understand how to ensure all my patients were enabled to have the same quality of life and death. That essentially is still at the core of what I aim to do today. Allocated to a haematology ward as a newly qualified nurse, I had been drawn not to the high tech environment but to the human aspects of caring for the dying, an interest I carried through to work with those with HIV/AIDs, as a district nurse and then the community palliative care nurse role where I met that memorable patient.

What I would hope to contribute to the EAPC if elected
In terms of geography, jobs, experiences and grey hair I have come a long way since then, but the desire to understand and make a difference is fundamentally what drives me still in my work in palliative care. My passion is to create and use robust evidence to improve care, and I enable this in a number of different ways as a researcher, teacher and journal editor. I’m particularly interested in the way that we communicate with and influence palliative care practice and practitioners, and have worked to facilitate this through my own writing and presenting, through continued development of the EAPC international peer reviewed research journal Palliative Medicine, and engagement in social media (personally @cewalshe, institutionally @ioelc and as editor @palliativemedj). I’ve worked nationally to promote palliative care research through past involvement in the UK Palliative Care Research Society and the PRiMa alliance, and to facilitate improved research dissemination through writing workshops and presentations. If elected I hope that I can bring this energy and experience to develop and promote palliative care in Europe, with a particular focus on the importance of research.

I currently work as Senior Lecturer in Palliative Care and Director of the International Observatory on End of Life Care at Lancaster University, UK. I’m engaged in research exploring issues of how palliative care is provided and how to address symptoms at the end of life, and teach on our PhD programme in palliative care. When not working I’m kept busy with four children, a dog and trying to become a slightly faster runner. As a volunteer trustee of my local hospice I’ve set myself the challenge of running the London Marathon this year for Hospice UK, but may well run the slowest marathon on record.

Coming up on the EAPC blog…
Every week in the run-up to the elections, we shall be publishing more posts from our candidates.  Click here to read the first two in the series. 

 

EAPC congress 2015Are you coming to Copenhagen?
See you at the 14th World Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care – Copenhagen, Denmark, 8-10 May, 2015. In Parallel Session 20: Building bridges between countries: Reporting research to have international resonance, Dr Catherine Walshe will be giving ‘The Editor’s Perspective’. Other contributors to this session are Dr Joachim Cohen on ‘The Research Perspective’ and Dr James Cleary on ‘The Reviewers’ Perspective’. Follow us on Twitter @EAPCOnlus – our official congress hashtag is #eapc2015 

 

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The challenges for provision of palliative care in Indonesia

Dr Christantie Effendy, PhD, a lecturer and researcher in the School of Nursing, Medical Faculty, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, explains the background to a longer article published in the March/April issue of the European Journal of Palliative Care.

Dr Christantei Effendy

Dr Christantie Effendy

In 1992, I began my nursing career and by 1994 I was working as a clinical nurse on the oncology ward at Dr Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta. I became more focused on cancer patients’ care when I joined the Indonesian Cancer Foundation (ICF). As a clinical nurse, I had experienced that most patients came to hospital in an advanced stage of cancer. Moreover, I had lost my grandmother, my cousin, relatives and friends because of cancer. For these reasons, I wanted to contribute to better palliative care in Indonesia. In 2001, I started my career as a lecturer. Now, in 2015, I have just received my PhD on the topic ‘The quality of palliative care for patients with cancer in Indonesia’.

Provision of palliative care in Indonesia is still in its infancy and is currently only available in seven cities in the three major islands of Indonesia: Surabaya, Jakarta, Yogyakarta, Bandung, Semarang, Denpasar and Makassar. Referral systems between hospital and primary care centres and vice versa have not been well developed. As a result of this, more patients with cancer suffer unnecessarily because of a high burden of symptoms and unmet needs, and die at home with insufficient support from palliative care professionals.

Recognising that patients with cancer should be given treatment and care that is patient-centred, I investigated assessment of problems and needs of cancer patients in Indonesia.1 I also carried out research to identify whether the problems experienced by patients had been taken care of and who were the people involved in addressing the problems of patients (doctors, nurses, and/or family members). 2

Bearing in mind that the quality of palliative care is important, and in Indonesia there is no tool to evaluate such care, I carried out a face-validation of quality indicators (QIs) for the organisation of palliative care based on similar indicators developed in Europe, and piloted the Indonesian QIs in six hospitals in Indonesia. In the future, these QIs can be used to evaluate the organisation of palliative care in Indonesian hospitals. 3

Bahasa Indonesia language edition of the 'Basic Care Training’ booklet for family caregivers

Bahasa Indonesia language edition of the ‘Basic Care Training’ booklet for family caregivers

In Indonesia, family caregivers are highly involved in caring for cancer patients.2 I therefore decided, together with colleagues at the School of Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, to conduct research on ‘Basic Care Training’ (BCT) for family caregivers. We also produced a video and booklet about BCT to help train family caregivers.

All kinds of developments in the provision of palliative care have already started – but still a lot must be done. Doing more research in palliative care, providing training for healthcare providers to be competent to implement services, incorporating palliative care modules in medical and nursing curricula, and increasing public awareness of palliative care can contribute to better quality care. I hope that what I have achieved in clinical care, education and research, and what I will do in these fields, can also contribute to the development of palliative care and improve the quality of its provision in Indonesia.

References

 1. Effendy C, Vissers K, Osse BH, et al. Comparison of problems and unmet needs of    patients with advanced cancer in a European country and an Asian country. Pain Pract 2014 Mar 26. doi: 10.1111/papr.12196. (Epub ahead of print).

2.Effendy C, Vissers. K, Tejawinata S, et.al. Dealing with symptoms and issues of hospitalized patients with cancer in Indonesia: the role of families, nurses, and physicians. Pain Pract 2014 May 2. doi: 10.1111/papr.12203. (Epub ahead of print).

3. Effendy C, Visser K, Woitha K, et al. Face-validation of quality indicators for the organisation of palliative care in hospitals in Indonesia: a contribution to quality improvement. Supportive Care in Cancer, 2014. 22 (12):3301-10.

EJPC_22_2_coverRead the full article in the European Journal of Palliative Care
This post relates to a longer article, ‘Palliative care in Indonesia’ by Christantie Effendy, Hana Rizmadewi Agustina, Martina Sinta Kristanti and Yvonne Engels, published in the March/April 2015 issue of the European Journal of Palliative Care (vol. 22.2).  If you have a web-based subscription to the journal you’ll be able to download this issue, plus all articles in the journal archive. You can also browse the archive and download articles by taking a 10-minute or 30-minute subscription. Members of the EAPC receive discounted subscription rates to the journal – click here to subscribe online. 

 

EAPC congress 2015

Are you coming to Copenhagen?
See you at the 14th World Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care – Copenhagen, Denmark, 8-10 May, 2015.  Follow us on Twitter @EAPCOnlus – our official congress hashtag is #eapc2015 

Veniți la Copenhaga?
Vă așteptăm să participați la cel de-al 14-lea Congres Mondial al Asociației Europene pentru Îngrijiri Paliative  – Copenhaga, Danemarca, 8-10 Mai, 2015.  Urmăriți-ne pe Twitter @EAPCOnlus – hashtag-ul official al congresului este #eapc2015 

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Colourful life of hospice volunteers in Europe  

Dr Ros Scott and Mag Leena Pelttari MSc (Palliative Care), Co-chairs of the EAPC Task Force on Volunteering in Hospice and Palliative Care.

Ros Scott

Dr Ros Scott

Volunteering plays a very significant role in hospice and palliative care. But when you start to think about the word ‘volunteering’ what does it mean to you? How would you describe it? This one word covers a very diverse group of individuals of all ages, backgrounds, cultures, life experiences, values and motivations, who undertake many varied activities and work in very different hospice and palliative care settings in many countries of the world.

Mag Leena Pelterri

Mag Leena Peltarri

 

So how can we begin to understand this complex world of volunteering so that we can effectively support and develop this precious resource in a local, regional, national and European context?

The EAPC Task Force on Volunteering in Hospice and Palliative Care has taken on this challenge and is working on several projects that we hope will help us to understand more about this complex phenomenon called volunteering. Firstly, we are discussing a European definition for Volunteering in Hospice and Palliative Care. Then, in partnership with Professor Lukas Radbruch and Katharina Pabst, we are undertaking a survey of national organisations, volunteer managers and volunteers in Europe looking at areas such as volunteer numbers, motivations, training, management and challenges. We are also developing a position paper on volunteering, which we hope will provide a basis for discussion and enable us to come to a shared view of hospice and palliative care volunteering in Europe. From this, we hope to develop a charter for volunteering to empower volunteers.

2nd Symposium: ‘Colourful Life of Hospice Volunteers in Europe’
One of our most exciting projects is a symposium to be held on 9 April 2015 in Vienna (see link below). After a successful symposium at the EAPC World Congress in Prague, in 2013, we’re organising this second symposium with Hospice Austria, the national organisation of hospice and palliative care institutions.

The main focus will be the future of volunteering in Europe 2020. How is volunteering changing in different European countries? Is there a common direction, or does development differ depending on the country? The EAPC Task Force position paper and the first results of our European study will be discussed. We’ll also do collaborative work on the charter for empowerment of volunteering. Volunteers will tell their stories and learn from each other by networking, encouraged by international contacts and exchange of ideas.

Later this year, we plan to launch a stories project to collect the experiences of volunteers and volunteer managers in their own words and languages (with English translation). We hope this will illustrate the survey findings and the theories about volunteering and its coordination, set out in the position paper.

It’s been a busy and productive year for the Task Force. We still have much to achieve but we are convinced that our work can help to make a difference to the development of volunteering in hospice and palliative care in Europe.

Links and resources

EAPC congress 2015Are you coming to Copenhagen?
Dr Ros Scott and Mag. Leena Pelttari MSc. (Palliative Care) will be running a Meet the Expert session on The future of Hospice and Palliative Care from a volunteering perspective on Sunday 10 May 2015 at the 14th World Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care in Copenhagen, Denmark. Follow us on Twitter @EAPCOnlus – our official congress hashtag is #eapc2015 

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EAPC Board elections: Introducing our candidates – Professor Manuel Luis Capelas

This new series introduces candidates for the European Association for Palliative Care Board of Directors who will be standing for election (or in some cases re-election) in May 2015. We hope the blog posts provide an opportunity for candidates to explain more about themselves and how they might contribute to the EAPC and the palliative care community more generally.  Board members are nominated by national associations or, in a few cases, by individual members. They are elected as individuals to service the EAPC for a four-year term, with one additional opportunity to be re-elected. The EAPC is keen to have Board members from all disciplines, at all stages of their career, and from all parts of Europe. 

The series continues today with Professor Manuel Luis Capelas, Institute of Health Sciences of the Catholic University of Portugal.

Professor Manuel Luis Capelas

Professor Manuel Luis Capelas

I am 49 years old, and a professor in the Institute of Health Sciences of the Catholic University of Portugal, where I coordinate several courses and curricular units of palliative care, at undergraduate or post-graduate levels. I am also the Coordinator of the Palliative Care Research Group. For the past nine years I have been involved with the Portuguese Association for Palliative Care (APCP), first as a member of the board of directors and, since 2012, as its President. Since 2013, I have been the director of the APCP journal, Cuidados Paliativos.

I think my interest in palliative care grew from the moment I started my career in 1990 as a nurse in a burns unit; suffering was always present and we did our best to relieve it. In 2004, I had the opportunity to do a Masters in Palliative Care, for which my dissertation was ‘The total pain in patients with bone metastasis’. Since then, I have become more involved in palliative care as a board member of APCP, as a speaker at national and international courses and congresses (including the EAPC Lisbon Congress in 2011), as a member of scientific committees (congresses and palliative care university courses), and as a reviewer of palliative care congresses or journals.

Nowadays, palliative care is one of the most important parts of my life (in my work as a professor and also as a tutor/mentor, which is my research area and one of my life’s missions). My main research interests are: education, organisation and quality of services. An important achievement for me is my PhD in Health Sciences/Palliative Care for which my thesis was ‘Quality Indicators for Palliative Care Services in Portugal’. Simultaneously, my contact with several palliative care professionals across the world (José Pereira, Maria Nabal, Carlos Centeno, Lukas Radbruch, Franco De Conno, Robin Faisinger, Eduardo Bruera, Isabel Neto, Xavier Gomez-Batiste, and David Oliver, among many others) has played an important part in increasing my engagement in the field.

When I am not working in palliative care, I like listening to music, reading, working out (swimming and gym), but most of all I like to be with my family. These activities are very important to my wellbeing.

Finally, if elected, I would bring the Southern European ‘voice’, with a special focus on Portugal, to the EAPC Board. I would hope to contribute to the vision of the EAPC and the different contexts of palliative care across Europe thus giving us a stronger role at European level. I would hope to stimulate Portuguese health professionals, especially those who work in palliative care services, to participate more actively in EAPC initiatives: research, education or participation at congresses. Also, I would contribute, with EAPC support, towards the development of a strong and adequate palliative care national programme. As a Portuguese, I would hope to strengthen links between the EAPC and Brazil, as well as African countries where the official language is Portuguese and where we have good relationships, and to help the promotion there of palliative care programme.

Coming up on the EAPC blog…
We shall be publishing more posts from our candidates in the run-up to the elections. Click here to read last week’s contribution from Prof Philip J Larkin.

EAPC congress 2015

Are you coming to Copenhagen?
See you at the 14th World Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care – Copenhagen, Denmark, 8-10 May, 2015. Follow us on Twitter @EAPCOnlus – our official congress hashtag is #eapc2015 

Vem a Copenhaga?
Vêmo-nos no 14o Congresso Mundial da Associação Europeia de Cuidados Paliativos – Copenhaga, Dinamarca, 8-10 Maio, 2015. Sigam-nos no Twitter @EAPCOnlus – o hashtag oficial do congresso é #eapc2015

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Mindfulness for resilience

Margaret O’Connor, Emeritus Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, and Research Consultant at Melbourne City Mission Palliative Care; and Suzanne Peyton, Mindfulness Educator and Palliative Care Nurse at Melbourne City Mission Palliative Care, explain the background to their longer article in the March/April issue of the European Journal of Palliative Care, which explores how mindfulness can support staff working with those who are emotionally distressed. 

Prof Margaret O'Connor (left) and Suzanne Peyton

Prof Margaret O’Connor (left) and Suzanne Peyton

Suzanne Peyton has worked at Melbourne City Mission Palliative Care in Melbourne Australia, for more than 20 years, in a variety of clinical and leadership roles. She has a background in nursing and has come to mindfulness through personal experience of the benefits of regular meditation. She leads a busy life, with a growing family, and combines part-time study with nursing and running her own business teaching mindfulness.

She finds that mindfulness enables her to pace her work and to take time between activities. The awareness that comes from being mindful enables her to see things more clearly, and be more discerning about what is happening in order to be steady and calm under pressure. This means being grounded in ‘real time’, instead of being pulled into the future or ruminating on past events. She firmly believes that if you teach mindfulness you need to practise it!

As the article in the European Journal of Palliative Care highlights, mindfulness originally developed to address the needs of clinical populations; it is only more recently that there has been a developing trend to apply mindfulness techniques to assist professional staff. Through her own experience, Suzanne came to the realisation that her colleagues also required replenishment and care.

“In working with vulnerable populations, it is important to understand that in sharing a common humanity, we are more similar to patients and carers than we are different. So our own vulnerabilities need to be recognised and supported in order to be more effective in our work.”

Suzanne suggests that daily mindfulness meditation means that the individual is then developing a sustainable habit that will enable them to approach their work more clearly. By training health professionals in new mind habits, the skills then reside in the worker, who cultivates a different way of ‘being’ in relation to the stresses of working with vulnerable people. Like learning to play a musical instrument, the more one practises mindfulness, the easier it gets. Similarly, daily meditation invites a person to become aware of the perceptions in their head, without reacting to the content. This gets easier over time as practice becomes part of everyday life.

A course participant had this to say about the course:

“I got more out of this course than I could ever have expected.  I am sceptical by nature but the impact that this has had on my life has led me to thoroughly recommend mindfulness to everyone. The course itself was utterly engaging and I found myself looking forward to the next session days in advance.  I will continue to practise mindfulness for a long time after the completion of the course due to the positive effects that I have noticed it to have on my overall health and happiness.”

From Suzanne’s experience of applying mindfulness in a workplace, she says that management support is essential and needs to be championed by one or more staff. Participation needs to be voluntary and offered among a suite of other supports, which may align with the values of organisations which employ staff that work in the helping professions. In relation to health professionals starting their careers, Suzanne notes the contemporary emphasis placed on teaching reflective practice, as well as skills for developing resilience, such as mindfulness training. She hopes then that new health professionals will be more aware of the issues of burnout and the importance of self care, to sustain themselves in their work.

To find out more…
Read more about mindfulness, including a video clip, on Suzanne’s website

EJPC_22_2_coverRead the full article in the European Journal of Palliative Care
This post relates to a longer article, ‘Mindfulness for resilience – a strategy for staff who work with those who are emotionally distressed’ by Margaret O’Connor and Suzanne Peyton, published in the March/April 2015 issue of the European Journal of Palliative Care (vol. 22.2). If you have a web-based subscription to the journal you’ll be able to download this issue, plus all articles in the journal archive. You can also browse the archive and download articles by taking a 10-minute or 30-minute subscription. Members of the EAPC receive discounted subscription rates to the journal – click here to subscribe online.

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EAPC Board elections: Introducing our candidates…

This new series introduces candidates for the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) Board of Directors who will be standing for election (or in some cases re-election) in May 2015. We hope the blog posts provide an opportunity for candidates to explain more about themselves and how they might contribute to the EAPC and the palliative care community more generally.  Board members are nominated by national associations or, in a few cases, by individual members. They are elected as individuals to service the EAPC for a four-year term, with one additional opportunity to be re-elected. The EAPC is keen to have Board members from all disciplines, at all stages of their career, and from all parts of Europe. The series starts today with a very well known international leader…

Professor Philip J Larkin, Joint Chair, Professor of Clinical Nursing (Palliative Care), University College Dublin School of Nursing Midwifery and Health Systems, and Our Lady’s Hospice & Care Services, Harold’s Cross, Dublin, Ireland.

Prof Philip J Larkin

Prof Philip J Larkin

Everyone should do one crazy thing in their life. It will either be the best thing you ever did or the worst. My decision to stand for the European Association for Palliative Care Board as incoming President of EAPC is one of those crazy decisions I may yet live to regret!

For the past 26 years I have been trying to say something important about palliative care. As a nurse, I have always believed in our unique contribution to the discipline of palliative care. Our place at critical times in the lives of our patients is exactly what Cicely Saunders always valued – the presence of another as a place of security. I did not always want to be a nurse. In fact, I trained as a music teacher and specialised in Voice. It certainly helped with my ability to understand a number of European languages such as French, German and Italian. It also taught me how to speak clearly – I lost some of my Irish accent but that is not a bad thing because where I come from, you would need an interpreter anyway!

This is a critical period for palliative care. The vision of others has made EAPC key to the future of global palliative care. The appointment of a new CEO is exciting and the important work of the World Health Organization initiative, led by Professor Xavier Gomez-Batiste, are two things that means the EAPC will need a steady hand to steer the right path in the coming years. In my current work as an academic professor and Chair of the All-Ireland Institute of Hospice and Palliative Care, I have learnt a great deal about partnership, co-operation, negotiation and collaboration – all key skills that will be needed by the EAPC to strengthen its global position and to which, I feel, I can contribute. I am not unknown to the EAPC, having been Vice-President between 2003-2007. That experience and the many contacts and friendships I have in palliative care will assist me greatly in contributing to the work of the Board.

My life is a busy one. My wife, who is also an academic, and I, tend to meet at airports. If elected, I am sure that the coming years with the EAPC won’t change that. Living in the West of Ireland means that I am fortunate to live in one of the most beautiful places in the world. Usually we have to fight off the tourists in the summer. Outside work, the important things (beside my wife!) are my three donkeys and falconry. You can learn a lot from birds of prey!

I am in no doubt of the challenge that being a Board Member of the EAPC brings, but I am honoured to stand and be part of the future for palliative care.

Coming up on the EAPC blog…
Look out for more blog posts from our candidates in the run-up to the election.

 

EAPC congress 2015

Are you coming to Copenhagen?
Professor Philip J Larkin and Dr Carlo Peruselli will debate ‘Individual autonomy versus relational autonomy in the context of clinical care in different parts of Europe – what is best for palliative care?’ in the plenary session on Sunday 10 May 2015  at the 14th World Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care in Copenhagen, Denmark. Follow us on Twitter @EAPCOnlus – our official congress hashtag is #eapc2015 

Vem a Copenhaga?
Vêmo-nos no 14o Congresso Mundial da Associação Europeia de Cuidados Paliativos – Copenhaga, Dinamarca, 8-10 Maio, 2015. Sigam-nos no Twitter @EAPCOnlus – o hashtag oficial do congresso é #eapc2015

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