How do neurology and palliative care services collaborate across Europe? EAPC Reference Group on Neurology and European Academy of Neurology launch new Europe-wide survey

Professor David Oliver, University of Kent, UK, is Chair of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) Reference Group on Neurology and a member of the management group of the European Academy of Neurology (EAN) Palliative Care Scientific Panel.  


Professor David Oliver.

The EAPC Reference Group on Neurology and the European Academy of Neurology Palliative Care Scientific Panel have enjoyed close working links since 2016. We are now delighted to embark on another joint Europe-wide survey that aims to help in the development of care and services for people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neurone disease (ALS/MND). We would like to encourage all involved in palliative care to take part in the survey.

Palliative care and ALS / MND

The care of people with ALS/MND has included palliative care for many years. Patients with ALS/MND were admitted to St Christopher’s Hospice from the very early days back in 1967. People with ALS/MND face a progressive deterioration and many symptoms. These include increasing muscle weakness, affecting arms, legs, often speech and swallowing and, later in the disease, respiratory muscle weakness, that leads to death after two to three years for most people. Thus, palliative care has a real role in their care, as people are faced with these physical issues as well as many psychological problems too, including cognitive changes in up to 40 per cent, and fronto-temporal dementia in up to 15 per cent.

The family caregivers face many changes and pressures, coping with the person with a deteriorating condition and their own reactions and emotions in caring – physical challenges as well as emotional / psychological issues. There may be similar issues for professional carers, as they care for someone who deteriorates during their care.

Often, people with ALS/MND are involved in the discussions with assisted dying, as they fear the process of dying. There are concerns that dying with ALS/MND is distressing with pain and dyspnoea, although several studies have shown that symptoms can be managed effectively at the end of life. 1  However, stories about distressing deaths are still discussed and publicised, as though they are the norm, when in reality they are not. There may also be many ethical issues arising in care, in particular the withdrawal of ventilation at the end of life, where palliative care services may be very helpful in these difficult discussions. 

Collaboration between palliative care and neurology – can we do better?

The involvement of palliative care services with people with ALS/MND is variable – across and within countries in Europe. A survey of palliative care specialists and neurologists in 2018, organised by the EAPC Reference Group on Neurology and a group from the European Academy of Neurology, did show that ALS/MND was one of the common diagnoses, together with cerebral tumours, where there was good collaboration between the two specialities. 2  However, when this may occur and to what extent is unclear.

Many guidelines, including the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Guideline on MND 3 and the European guideline, suggest palliative care involvement early in the disease progression but there is anecdotal evidence that patients may only be seen at the end of life.

Please complete the survey…

The survey conducted by the EAPC Reference Group on Neurology and EAN Palliative Care Scientific Panel seeks input from palliative care specialists across Europe. We want to know more about the level of collaboration and the timing of involvement, and we encourage all of you involved in palliative care to take part.

The survey is available at https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/NNK7YZ/and takes 15 to 20 minutes to complete. The link is now open and will remain so until the end of November. The aim is to help in the development of care and services for people with ALS/MND. Please do help us improve care for people with ALS/MND and their carers.

References

  1. Neudert C, Oliver D, Wasner M, Borasio GD. The course of the terminal phase in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Journal of Neurology 2001; 248: 612-616.
  2. Oliver DJ, Borasio GD, Caraceni A, de Visser M, Grisold W, Lorenzl S, Veronese S, Voltz R. A consensus review on the development of palliative care for patients with chronic and progressive neurological disease. Eur J Neurol 2016; 23: 30-38.
  3. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Motor neurone disease: assessment and management. NICE Guideline NG 42. NICE 2016. www.nice.org.uk/guidance/NG42
  4. Anderson PM, Abrahams S, Borasio GD, de Carvalho M, Chio A, Van Damme P, Hardiman O, and the members of the EFNS Task Force.  EFNS guidelines on the clinical management of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: revised report of an EFNS task force. Eur J Neurol 2012; 19: 360-375.

Links

 

 

Posted in EAPC Task Forces/Reference Groups, Neurology | Tagged | 2 Comments

Sedation in Palliative Care: Practice and challenges: An interview with Dr Eva Katharina Schildmann, joint winner of the 2020 EAPC Early Researcher Award

LIVE FROM THE 11th EAPC WORLD RESEARCH CONGRESS ONLINE…

Highlights of every European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) Congress are the EAPC Researcher Awards. Awarded jointly by the EAPC and the EAPC Research Network (RN), these awards recognise and support the work of scientists and clinicians in the field of palliative care who make an outstanding contribution to research and clinical practice. 

Yesterday (8 October 2020), Dr Eva Katharina Schildmann was awarded the 2020 EAPC Early Researcher Award. We talk to her about her work as a palliative care physician and leader of a research group at the Department of Palliative Medicine of LMU Klinikum, Munich, Germany, and the research that has led to her award.


Dr Eva Katharina Schildmann.

Who, or what, inspired you to follow a career in palliative care? 

Eva Katharina SchildmannAn important inspiration was the close personal contact with seriously ill patients during my time at medical school – starting with my first nursing work experience on a surgical ward in Munich. In addition, training in communication skills and medical ethics and law during my year of studies at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry in Londonstimulated my interest in topics closely related to palliative care. Later on, during my medical training, I enjoyed working in haematology/oncology very much, but again realised that it was in caring for incurably ill patients and their families where I really saw myself. I regard it as a great privilege to have the time and resources to provide good care, together with all other members of our multiprofessional team, and to share important moments with patients and their families. 

Can you tell us briefly about the research that has led to your winning this award and some of the main findings, as well as your current projects?

EKS: My research interests and activities to date have focussed on outcome measurement, complexity and costs in palliative care and on sedation in palliative care. Regarding outcome measurement, together with Claudia Bausewein and in co-operation with colleagues from the Cicely Saunders Institute, London, as well as several colleagues in Germany, I conducted a project on validation of the Integrated Palliative Care Outcome Scale (IPOS) in Germany, a patient-reported outcome measure to assess patients´ palliative care needs. As to the second topic – complexity and costs in palliative care – we explored respective experiences and views of experts, analysed the cost-covering of the German Diagnosis-related-Groups system and developed a costing methodology for German inpatient palliative care – as a basis for a larger project to develop a casemix classification for palliative care.

Currently, the main focus of my research is sedation in palliative care. Our results from a systematic review of guidelines, as well as quantitative and qualitative studies, demonstrate the different concepts of ‘palliative sedation’ between guidelines and among German healthcare professionals, and the uncertainty, when the use of sedative drugs constitutes ‘(palliative) sedation’. Accordingly, it often remains unclear when exactly guidance on ‘palliative sedation’ should be followed. In two current research projects, which are funded by the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research, we assess practice of sedation at the end of life in nursing homes, in different specialties such as oncology, neurology and geriatrics, and in specialist palliative care settings. In addition to gathering quantitative and qualitative data, we developed a method to operationalize sedation, based on dosage of specific drugs. By this approach we hope to improve comparability of practices, which is currently limited by the different concepts of ‘palliative sedation’. By our empirical work, and in collaboration with researchers from palliative care, ethics and law we aim to inform future guidance on sedation practices in specialist palliative care and beyond.

Which qualities do you think are the most important in a researcher? And what else is important for young researchers in your opinion?

EKS: I think most important is having a ‘mission’ – though this can be simple and small at the start and can develop and ‘mature’ later. Other crucial qualities are openness, curiosity, being a team player, perseverance, patience, determination and sometimes also courage. Of course, it is also necessary to deal with frustration, and to ‘stand up again’. A good team and a supporting mentor are very important – and I feel very privileged to have both. 

How do you see your role (and palliative care researchers in general) linked to that of clinicians?

EKS: A close link and continuous exchange between clinical practice and research is crucial to ensure impact of research results on practice. In fact, I have both roles, working as a researcher as well as a physician in our department. By combining research and clinical experience and letting them inspire each other, I aim to contribute to ongoing improvement of care of patients and their families.

What does winning the EAPC Early Researcher Award mean to you?  

EKSIt is a great honour and an additional motivation to carry on with research as well as clinical work now and in the future. It is also an excellent chance to make the work of my team more visible on an international level. I would like to make use of this chance to develop more research collaborations within the EAPC Research Network. I hope that this award will therefore support me regarding my overall aim: to conduct rigorous research, which is of relevance for seriously ill patients, their families and the healthcare professionals caring for them.

Let’s talk about life outside of palliative care: What’s your favourite novel?

EKS: There are too many novels I love to be able to select the one favourite!

Currently, I am reading ‘Momo’ by Michael Ende with my younger daughter – which I last read when I was about 10 years old myself. I am enthralled by the beauty of its language and the wisdom it holds regarding the mysteries of time. Another novel that really fascinated me more recently was ‘The buried giant’ by Kazuo Ishiguro.


Eva’s presentation, ‘Sedation in Palliative Care: Practice and challenges’, and the live panel discussion, are available for registered delegates to view online on the congress platform until 31 January 2021. To access the congress platform, click here: https://online.eapcnet.eu and login. (If you have forgotten your password go to https://online.eapcnet.eu/login/forgot_password.php enter the email address you registered to the congress with into the search bar in lowercase to generate a further automated email from the site).

Everyone can view the Abstracts from the 11thEAPC World Research Congress 7 to 9 October 2020, Palliative Medicine, volume: 34, issue 1_suppl; page(s): 1-280.

Links

  • Find more information on Eva Katharina Schildmann on Orcid.
  • View more posts relating to the 11th EAPC World Research Congress Online here, including interviews with Dr Lucas Morin, joint winner of the 2020 EAPC Early Researcher Award, and Associate Professor Melissa Bloomer, 2020 EAPC Post-doctoral Award winner.

 

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Contextualising constraints to improve palliative care in acute care: An interview with Associate Professor Melissa Bloomer, winner of the 2020 EAPC Post-doctoral Award

LIVE FROM THE 11th EAPC WORLD RESEARCH CONGRESS ONLINE…

Highlights of every European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) Congress are the EAPC Researcher Awards. Awarded jointly by the EAPC and the EAPC Research Network (RN), these awards recognise and support the work of scientists and clinicians in the field of  palliative care who make an outstanding contribution to research and clinical practice.

Earlier today (8 October 2020), Melissa Bloomer was awarded the 2020 EAPC Post-doctoral Award. We talk to her about her work as an Associate Professor of Nursing in the School of Nursing and Midwifery and the Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research at Deakin University, Australia, and the research that has led to her award.


Melissa Bloomer.

Who, or what, inspired you to follow a career in palliative care?

Melissa Bloomer: My interest in palliative care began 14 years ago when I was working as a critical care nurse. My father sustained a severe traumatic brain injury, spending six months in neurosurgical critical care. During this time, it was overwhelmingly evident that recognition and acceptance of dying in critical care, and the provision of end-of-life care, could be improved. I was very aware how the focus on resuscitation and life-saving in critical care sometimes resulted in prolonged suffering and a traumatic and protracted dying period for the patient and their family. Hence, I decided to pursue a research career in palliative care, focusing on inpatient non-palliative care settings, such as critical care and acute care. 

Can you tell us briefly about the research that has led to your winning this award and some of the main findings?

MB: My first experience as part of a research team was in 2008, where I was involved in a multidisciplinary study to explore end-of-life care in the intensive care unit. Since then, I have focused on building a programme of research spanning critical care (neonate, paediatric and adult), acute care and aged rehabilitation settings, areas not routinely staffed by specialist palliative care clinicians. The foci of my research, including my Doctoral studies, have been on investigating recognition of dying, communication and decision-making, family care, bereavement support, preparedness for patient death, and care of vulnerable populations such as those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, the oldest-old and people with dementia. 

As a registered nurse, I have also remained committed to giving back to my profession and using my expertise as a palliative care researcher to improve patient and family care at the end of life, informing nursing curricula, and influencing national education and research agendas via organisations such as the World Federation of Critical Care Nurses, Australian College of Nursing, and the Australian College of Critical Care Nurses.

I have built an international profile as an end-of-life care researcher, and collaborated with colleagues from multiple countries including the UK, Israel, Belgium, Saudi Arabia, China and New Zealand; with these international collaborations being some of the most fruitful in terms of scholarly contribution and outcomes.

You come from a nursing background, how can we encourage more nurses to undertake research in palliative care?   

MB: One of the first challenges in motivating nurses to get involved in research is making it relevant. While for many the relevance of research to nursing and specifically palliative care is obvious, it is through research that we understand the human experience, learn about the effectiveness of treatments or interventions and so on. But for some, research appears to be a concept far removed from caring, which is the essence of nursing. For me, it was when I realised the power of research to improve caring, that it became relevant.

The reality is that every one of us will experience the death of another, perhaps the death of someone in our personal lives, or the death of a patient. Either way, even when the death cannot be prevented, how the death occurs, and how the patient and their family are supported can always be improved. Hence, palliative care research is relevant to all nurses, given death occurs across all practice settings.

Which qualities do you think are the most important in a researcher? And what advice would you give to other young researchers?  

MB: Having a passion for research is really important. Research is often quite challenging, time-consuming and tedious. So it’s really important to not only be good at what you do, but also to be driven by passion and a commitment to improve patient outcomes even if, in the case of palliative care, that means not stopping a death, but instead ensuring high-quality care before and after death.

I also believe that it is essential that researchers place a high priority on ensuring the ethical conduct of research. Given palliative care research may involve participants who are highly vulnerable, ensuring an individual’s rights are protected is essential.

How do you see your role (and palliative care researchers in general) linked to that of clinicians? 

MB: Palliative care researchers and clinicians are inextricably linked. They are happily co-dependent if you like. It is working with clinicians that ensures palliative care research is relevant, realistic and will value-add. And it is through research, that we are able to provide the evidence to influence care, measure effectiveness of an intervention, and build our understanding of the human experience of patients, family and clinicians in palliative care.

What does winning the EAPC Postdoctoral Researcher Award mean to you?  

MB: Receiving the EAPC Postdoctoral Researcher award is a huge honour. The award is self-affirming and confirms that my research, which spans the gap between acute care and palliative care, is worthy and important. It’s also wonderful to be recognised internationally in this way and I hope this leads to new connections and research collaborations.

Let’s talk about life outside of palliative care: What’s your favourite novel and/or what three music albums would you take to a desert island?

Geographical Centre of the Simpson Desert… the most terrifying and exhilarating thing I have ever done.

MB: Interesting question. I am not sure I have a favourite novel, but morbidly I do find myself being drawn to any, and all, books about death, dying, views on mortality in the modern age and even serial killers! My bookshelf is full!

As for music, I’ve never been a huge music lover. I don’t listen to music at all in fact. What I do love is time spent in conversation, whether that be about our daily lives, or a philosophical debate about current world issues. And if I am not doing that, I love camping and getting ‘off the beaten track’. I live in Australia and we have some magnificent outback destinations. Just last year I crossed the Simpson Desert in a four-wheel drive with my husband; and just to make it that bit harder, we did it by compass bearing to the geographical centre. It was the most terrifying and exhilarating thing I have ever done. The silence and the stars at night in the desert are so captivating that there is no need or desire for music. 


Registered delegates can view Melissa’s presentation, ‘Contextualising constraints to improve palliative care in acute care’ until 31 January 2021. Go to the congress platform https://online.eapcnet.eu and login. If you need to reactivate this, click here https://online.eapcnet.eu/login/forgot_password.php  and type the email address you registered with in lowercase to generate an automated email from the site.

Everyone can view the Abstracts from the 11th EAPC World Research Congress 7 to 9 October 2020, Palliative Medicine, volume: 34, issue 1_suppl; page(s): 1-280.

  • Find more information on Melissa Bloomer at Deakin University ResearchGate and Orcid. Follow Melissa on Twitter @MelissaJBloomer
  • View more posts relating to the 11th EAPC World Research Congress Online #EAPC2020 here including interviews with joint winners of the 2020 EAPC Early Researcher Awards, Dr Lucas Morin and Dr Eva Katharina Schildmann.
Posted in 11th EAPC World Research Congress Online, EAPC Researcher Awards, EAPC World Research Congresses, INTERVIEWS & TRIBUTES, Nursing | Tagged | Leave a comment

‘Journal of Palliative Medicine’: Prize for Best European Scientific Paper published in 2019 to be announced at #EAPC2020

Only two days to #EAPC2020 … The 11th World Research Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care which, for the first time ever, will take place online with interactive online sessions 7 to 9 October 2020 with on-demand content available now available.

Ahead of the congress, we’re delighted to give some highlights of what’s in store at #EAPC2020. Today, Dr Charles F von Gunten, Editor-in-Chief of  ‘Journal of Palliative Medicine’, welcomes you to his session on Friday, 9 October when he will announce the winner of the journal’s ‘Best European Scientific Paper’. He also unveils ‘Palliative Medicine Reports’, the journal’s new open-access sister journal.


Charles F. von Gunten.

The EAPC and Journal of Palliative Medicine are again collaborating to offer a prize of 1,000 Euros for the best scientific paper by European authors published in 2019. The prize will be formally announced at the EAPC World Research Congress Online Friday, 9 October 2020 during the plenary. Thirty-six papers accepted for publication in 2019 are eligible for the prize – nearly double the number eligible in 2018. The winner has been chosen by a committee comprising the EAPC and Journal of Palliative Medicine. While we will leave that a secret until the meeting, I can tell you that the winning paper has already enjoyed more than 1,000 downloads as of the end of September 2020 – and the number is continuing to grow!

Palliative Medicine Reports – a new sister journal to Journal of Palliative Medicine.

In January 2020, we launched Palliative Medicine Reports, an online only, open-access sister journal. There are at least two reasons for this. First, the rising quality of more than 700 manuscripts submitted to Journal of Palliative Medicine annually vastly exceeds the space available in this scientific journal that is published both in print and online. Second, the number of funders and governments who require authors to publish open access, especially in Europe, is growing. To submit manuscripts, go to https://home.liebertpub.com/publications/palliative-medicine-reports/656/for-authors. There will be an Article Processing Charge, but our publisher is waiving this fee for a short period of time as we launch the journal.

Journal of Palliative Medicine (JPM)

The number of full-text downloads in 2019 was 362,046 – a 30% year-over-year increase. The number of abstract-only views was 619,107 – a 20% year-over-year increase. JPM enjoys more than 7,000 followers, a 40% year-over-year increase, on Twitter. The most recent impact factor is 2.477.  The journal is divided into sections where Letters (500 words) report observations and opinions, Brief Reports (1,500 words) give information about preliminary work, and Research Reports (3,000 words) represent well-designed studies and investigations. In this Issue provides a one-page summary of key contents. The most read section of the journal continues to be the Personal Reflections section, which presents the engagement of clinicians with the work.

Palliative Medicine Reports and Journal of Palliative Medicine are indexed by Medline and several other indexing services. They are made available through HINARI to developing countries. The companion biweekly eNewsletter, Briefingsmade available to subscribers, delivers the latest breaking news and information to keep clinicians and healthcare providers continuously updated via e-mail.

JPM – a global journal

Professional associations that have established a formal relationship with JPM include (in alphabetical order): The Asia Pacific Hospice and Palliative Care Association, Australia & New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine (ANZSPM), Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians (CSPCP), Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC), European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC), Hospice & Palliative Nurses Association (HPNA), and the Japanese Society for Palliative Medicine (JSPM).

I look forward to meeting you at 9 am CET on Friday 9 October.

Links – and a special offer for EAPC members!


It’s not too late to register… Join Dr Charles F von Gunten and palliative care specialists from across the world at the 11th World Research Congress Online of the European Association for Palliative Care. Interactive online sessions take place on 7 to 9 October 2020 and masses of on-demand content is now available until 31 January 2021.

A blend of Pre-recorded On-demand Sessions, Live Presentations, Live Panels hosted by international experts, Children’s Seminar, Meet the Expert, Poster Sessions and EAPC Group Meetings, will bring you all the latest research from the world’s top researchers in palliative and end-of-life care. CME accreditation will be available. Meet some of our plenary speakers on the EAPC YouTube channel. Find out more, view/download the live interactive programme and browse the book of abstracts here. Register here.

Important message: Registered delegates can now enter the congress platform to view on-demand content: more than 700 presentations and posters, exhibitions and more to be added! All available to view until 31 January 2021.To access the congress platform, click here: https://online.eapcnet.eu and login. If you registered for the congress but did not receive login details, please click here https://online.eapcnet.eu/login/forgot_password.php Type the email address you registered with in lowercase to generate an automated email from the site.

 

Posted in 11th EAPC World Research Congress Online, EAPC World Research Congresses, EAPC-LINKED JOURNALS, Journal of Palliative Medicine | Leave a comment

Five spiritual strengths your patients might be pursuing

Another contribution to our Spirituality and Palliative Care series that looks at how people deal with crisis and suffering when confronted with life-threatening disease. Today, our guest writer is Marc Haufe, PhD researcher spiritual care at the Care Ethics department of the University of Humanistic Studies in the Netherlands. Marc is co-author of a longer article on this subject published in ‘BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care’ and now available in Open Access.


Marc Haufe.

Fostering spiritual or existential strength is often mentioned as very important within spiritual palliative care. But when it comes to these strengths, are we aware enough of what they entail?

Let’s look at patient Hanna

“…What I really wish is that when people come to visit we could have a really meaningful conversation. It doesn’t have to be sad and gloomy either… You can talk about meaning and hope and all those things… hope for closure, for knowing that my kids will be ok when I’m gone, that I’ve left them with an ability to live a meaningful life…    Why can’t we talk about our friendship – what the life we share together – means? …  Why can’t they look at me and acknowledge the courage it takes to walk down this road, to make these choices, to believe in myself, to live the best I can for however long I can? Why can’t they tell me I have courage? That I have strength?” (Bell 2018)

Seeing strengths?

Within the context of the DIAMAND project, our research team identified five distinct spiritual strengths in the recent literature that patients and professionals can foster in various ways.

Figure 1: The Propeller; a model of spiritual strength fostering.

Meaning

Patients may pursue meaning, through deeper understanding and feeling what is truly significant to them. In the above excerpt, we can recognise two of the ways found to foster meaning. Patient Hanna wishes to talk about and reassess what is important to her. She also seeks acknowledgment of an essentially positive self.

Connection

Patients can pursue connection, through a feeling of deep sharing with others. Above, Hanna wishes to connect on a deeper level with her friends, to open up about what it’s like to share a life and care for each other

Agency

Strength can also be found in agency, through experiencing a capacity to act, to be able to do and affect. Hanna seeks reassurance that the road she takes and the choices she makes attest to this capacity. It takes courage to make choices which, in the palliative phase, often entails the refocusing of goals and continuous adaptation.

Hope

Hope can be found through having a positive perspective on the possibilities of the future. Hanna may be said to hope for a special outcome of closure and wishes a meaningful life for her children.

Faith

Hanna does not speak of the strength of faith, placing trust in the supernatural and honouring it. But it may well be that in further conversations, spiritual tradition, or a benevolent force, become important themes.

Talking strengths?

Are we sensitive enough to what ‘our Hannas’ seek regarding spiritual strengths, so that we don’t impede and, if desired, aid? Having the above in mind when speaking with them could be useful.

If you want to know more about fostering spiritual strengths you are welcome to email me. Or, please read our article recently published in BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care and available as Open Access, or listen to my oral presentation at the 11th EAPC World Research Congress Online. My presentation, How can existential or spiritual strengths be fostered in palliative care?: An interpretative synthesis of recent literature, is one of the many on-demand presentations now available for registered delegates to view until 31 January 2021. You can also find my presentation free of charge on the EAPC YouTube channel: https://youtu.be/pYZigoMBjoA

References

  1. The DIAMAND project is a research project that aims to further develop spiritual conversation skills of professional working in palliative care. It is funded by ZonMW and is a collaboration between the University of Humanistic Studies (Carlo Leget, Marieke Potma and Marc Haufe) and the University Medical Centre of Utrecht (Saskia Teunissen).

Whitley Bell, K. (2018) Living at the end of life; a hospice nurse addresses the most common questions. New York, NT: Sterling Publishing.

Haufe, M, Leget, C, Potma, M, Teunissen, S. (2020) How can existential or spiritual strengths be fostered in palliative care? An interpretative synthesis of recent literature. BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care. View the full-text article here.

Links and resources


It’s not too late to register… Join palliative care specialists from across the world at the 11th World Research Congress Online of the European Association for Palliative Care.

Interactive online sessions take place 7 to 9 October 2020 and on-demand content is available now until 31 January 2021. A blend of Pre-recorded On-demand Sessions, Live Presentations, Live Panels hosted by international experts, Children’s Seminar,Meet the Expert,Poster Sessions and EAPC Group Meetings, will bring you all the latest research from the world’s top researchers in palliative and end-of-life care. CME accreditation will be available. Browse the Book of Abstracts, the live interactive programme and register here.

Registered delegates can access the congress platform at https://online.eapcnet.eu and then login.  (If you registered for the congress but did not receive login details, please click here https://online.eapcnet.eu/login/forgot_password.php Type the email address you registered with in lowercase to generate an automated email from the site).

Posted in SPIRITUAL CARE | Tagged | 1 Comment