Mapping palliative care services in Norway

Natasha Pedersen, Chief Executive Officer and Founder, ‘Ja til lindrende enhet og omsorg for barn’ (‘Yes to palliative units and care for children’), Norway, shares some exciting news that heralds a step forward in Norwegian palliative care.

Natasha Pedersen. Photograph: © Stein J Bjørge, Aftenposten

Natasha Pedersen. Photograph: © Stein J Bjørge, Aftenposten

The Norwegian Minister of Health and Care Services wants to know more about palliative care, to get new, updated knowledge in this area and also to learn from other countries, especially from Denmark and the UK. As an organisation that has been working closely with Norwegian parliament and the government, this is thrilling news for us and we are delighted, especially because the minister will emphasise both the user perspective and children in this work.

Palliative care in Norway has focused mainly on cancer patients and is a comparatively new field in our country. The last big review was back in 1999. Since then much has happened in terms of research and education in many countries, including Norway.

Bent Høie, Minister of Health and Care Services for Norway

Bent Høie, Minister of Health and Care Services for Norway

On 30 January 2014, the Minister of Health and Care Services, Bent Høie (Conservative), submitted a request to The Norwegian Directorate of Health (an executive agency and competent authority accountable to the Norwegian Ministry of Health and Care Services) on how to target and personalise the provision of palliative services to patients’ needs in the future. He wants to strengthen knowledge and skills in palliative care and has requested a report that will provide an overview of  knowledge and awareness and what kind of experiences users and their relatives have national and international, how the different services are organised – both practically and administratively – and how this affects the quality of supply. This report will also look at the needs of children and young people with special needs. He also wants to know about how to achieve a good and systematic co-operation between the public healthcare services and other stakeholders, such as non-governmental and non-profit organisations.

The Minister of Health and Care Services stated that:

“To ensure that in the future we have the right expertise in this field, the report will also include this question. We need knowledge about what skills we have today, but not least, what skills we need in this area going forward. The reason for this is simple: We should be confident that patients in a sensitive and difficult situation, with complex needs, are met in the best possible way.”

He has requested that The Norwegian Directorate of Health should put together a research group for this report and has made it clear that non-profit organisations will have an important part in making this report.

The deadline for the report is 1 December 2014. This report will lay an important foundation on how to design and organise palliative care services in the future in Norway. And it is also the right time to get a systematic overview of palliative care provision in Norway with regard to what is happening in the World Health Organization (WHO). (In January 2014 the Executive Board of the WHO called on Member States to strengthen palliative care as a component of integrated treatment throughout the life course and recommended that the 67th World Health Assembly adopt a resolution on this subject in May 2014). The report should also help us to ensure the quality of service provision and ensure that we all are going in the same direction in Norway.

References
Stortinget
Aftenpost

To find out more…

  • Click here to read more about ’Ja til lindrende enhet og omsorg for barn’ (‘Yes to palliative units and care for children’). 
  • You can read a previous post from Natasha Pedersen about children’s palliative care in Norway on the EAPC Blog. 

Children’s palliative care: New journal calls for papers …
The first journal on children’s palliative care in the Nordic countries is launching in 2014. We warmly welcome contributed articles on education in children’s palliative care and children’s hospices for the next editions. For author’s guidelines and more information, please contact Natasha Pedersen

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HAS COMPLETED THE EAPC SOCIAL MEDIA ACTIVITIES ONLINE SURVEY.  THERE’S STILL TIME TO COMPLETE IT BEFORE THE CLOSING DATE ON  FRIDAY 28 MARCH – JUST CLICK HERE TO COMPLETE THE SURVEY.

This entry was posted in ADVOCACY & POLICY, NATIONAL & INTERNATIONAL REPORTS and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Mapping palliative care services in Norway

  1. Pingback: Mapping palliative care services in Norway | EAPC Blog | All Things Palliative - Article Feed

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